The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2009.08.05 Getting into hot water with the dirty dishes

Written by David Green.

It’s a little disconcerting how many dishes David and I can pile up before one of us washes them. It’s not so terrible, certainly not a health department situation—we usually rinse the dishes very well before stacking them at the side of the sink. We’re awaiting a pile big enough to warrant running water hot enough to get them spic and span clean...water so hot the dishes air dry in almost no time.

We’re big fans of air drying and were happily vindicated when air drying was found to be more sanitary than using a dish towel. Sure, using a dish towel to dry dishes means your kitchen looks neat and tidy right away, but oy, adding all those germs to spic and span clean dishes?

I know most of you are probably dishwasher fans, but we’ve lived without the appliance for so long, there’s nothing to miss about it—washing dishes by hand is just the normal course of action around our house.

And now that we wear bright and fancy (hot pink for him, neon green for me) super duper rubber gloves, dishwashing is a real joy. “They’re tough! They’re comfortable! They’re...True Blues: the Ultimate Household Gloves,” is what it says on the packaging.

“True Blues” really are the ultimate in rubber gloves. They’re vinyl, actually, with a substantial cotton liner, so your hands slide in and out easily and you’re not faced with the sad scenario of trying to extricate your hands from gloves that seem to have welded themselves to your fingers, finally having to turn the sweat filled gloves inside out to get them off—and later struggling to get the fingers right side in again.

No problem like that with “True Blues”—and “True Blues” are longer than most rubber gloves so you don’t get wet wrists (or water slipping inside) should your arms happen to cross the stream of running water.

Running water...it’s the theme here. We run what seems like a heck of a lot of water before it gets hot enough...full throttle hot...to wash and rinse dishes. That’s why we usually accumulate enough dishes to make it worth all that water going down the drain in pursuit of hotter water.

Our eating habits over the course of a day lend themselves to the use of lots of dishes. A plate here for the toast, a bowl there for the oatmeal, a plate for a muffin, a bowl for soup.

It’s really a bit silly how many dishes two people can go through in a day. I wonder if it’s empty nest eating habits. I know I make fewer real meals and we just graze more. Or we just keep finding more food to eat with no real dinner plan.

“Hmm, what else can I eat? I’ve had rice and lentils, a hunk of Jarsberg cheese, a carrot, some lettuce and an apple...what would complete this meal?” David might ask before concluding a rice cake spread with peanut butter and sprinkled with chocolate chips would do the trick...and there goes another plate.

Well, that would mean another plate for me. After my drippy tomato and pesto sandwich, there’s no way a rice cake is going to make its way on my plate. I don’t like to mix flavors so dessert always gets its own plate.

But a few days ago, the insanity of the rapidly multiplying dishes on the kitchen counter got to me.

“Let’s try using just one bowl, one plate, and one set of silverware each for one week,” I suggested.

“That’s pretty much what I do when you’re on vacation,” David replied.

“So what’s the difference when I’m here?  I asked. I’m a bad influence?”

He didn’t reply. I think he suspected he might find himself in hot water. But, obviously, I am a bad influence. David would have put that rice cake right on top of his dirty rice and lentils bowl.

I proposed that we just use one of each, kind of like we’d do if we were camping, and then wash it as soon as we were done.

David said he’d consider it if we had a hot water on-demand heater, but he didn’t want to wash dishes in anything but hot water.

I’ve always been a “hottest water possible” dishwashing fan, but I think a seed was planted for me last spring when Maddie asked an innocent question.

She was at her boyfriend Neil’s apartment, they were washing dishes and he wasn’t using hot water.

“Why do we use hot water to wash dishes?” she asked me afterwards.

Why? What kind of question is that? That’s like asking why do we breathe, it’s just basic to life as we know it. That was my immediate reaction.

Isn’t it basic science? Doesn’t hot water kill germs and cut through grease?

But Neil pointed out that bacteria grow in a warm environment. And wouldn’t dish soap cut through grease?

I don’t know who’s right, but I think I’m ready to test the only-one-bowl waters.

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