The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2006.07.12 She's fortunate in both friends and fiber

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

I’ve had a string of good luck lately—in both selecting books to read and hitching up with old friends. That’s encouraging. I was beginning to think I had a cloud hanging over my head. The recent flood of good balances out the string of bad luck I’ve had in obtaining freebies for the Nuts About Nature summer reading program at the library. It seems every road I’ve turned down has had a roadblock.

The most disappointing was the snazzy flask-shaped water bottle people who replied with a curt, “I regret to inform you that we cannot honor your request at this time.”

I don’t recall how the water tasted, besides expensive, but it was contained in the most unique rectangular bottle that holds a manageable 11.2 fluid ounces with a sports bottle cap and a sturdy plastic clip that attaches easily to your pants. We’ve been reusing them since April and I thought they’d make a perfect give-away for the kids to take on nature hikes.

Maddie and I found the bottled water on a trip to New York while visiting the cafeteria at the Fashion Institute of Technology. As an upcoming high school senior, she doesn’t have a clue what she wants to study in college, but when someone asked what stimulates her intellectually and she said, “I just want to wear pretty clothes and live in New York,” I thought FIT might be a good fit for her. So far it’s just a good source for unique bottled water—only not for free.

For a seed mosaic project, I tried to get a wide variety of unique seeds from a mail-order company my food co-op does business with—no response. Same with an incredibly cute and inventive lightning bug flashlight, and a sheet of beautiful flower stickers.

But when one arena of my life is down in the dumps it’s so nice when it’s balanced out by good in other areas—and right now that’s good books and old buddies.

A lot of books are forgettable—kind of like junk food that fails to nourish. Eat an outstanding meal, whether at a fancy, expensive restaurant or a humble gathering of good friends, and the memory stays with you. It’s real and it’s good and it’s meaningful, especially when surrounded by people you love.

Because my life falls apart when I become immersed in a good book, I have to limit my selections and choose wisely. If I’m going to be a book slut I want to be doing it for a good cause, not a dose of Doritos. I don’t have time to read everything I want so I like to make what I read count. Oh, I read marshmallow fluff every now and then, just like I eat Cheetoes and too much chocolate, but I don’t feel so good afterward.

But the books I’ve read recently are substantial, full of fiber and flavor.

I think the latest string started off with Steve Amick’s “The Lake, the River and the Other Lake” and has continued with The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls (reminiscent of Frank McCourt’s Angela’s Ashes and The Liars’ Club by Mary Karr).

“The Glass Castle” was so good, I read way into the night, unable to put it down until David banged on the floor at 4 a.m. He made such a clamor I thought he fell out of bed, so I ran upstairs to check on him and decided I might as well go to bed since I was upstairs anyway.

And just last week, I finished “Luncheonette” by Steven Sorrentino, a memoir that takes place in New Jersey, but it's very New York and ethnic and has the funniest character, Dolores, a waitress at the luncheonette.

It was so good I didn't want to return to reality after reading it so I dilly dallied over the acknowledgments in the back of the book. It was the Fourth of July and I was being a book slut. I should have been making food for a potluck party and I should have been proofreading Observer copy, but it was such a good book I had to finish it.

Midway through the acknowledgments, all of a sudden I’m reading, "I am so grateful to Stuart Krichevsky, my agent...."  “Stuart Krichevsky!” I yell out loud and nearly fall off the couch. How many Stuart Krichevskys can there be, I wonder. My google search produces photos that could obviously be the grown-up version of the Stuart Krichevsky I went to high school with. What a hoot! So I email him off his website and he writes back, happy that I've written him since he's not really kept in contact with anybody from high school.

And it’s not just the unexpected blast from the past of Stuart. In April I saw Stuart’s best buddy, Steve, in June I bumped into Richard, an old college boyfriend. Last week, college friends Pam and Merle stopped by and this weekend I’ll be meeting up with my high school friend Sondra, who will be in Michigan for a wedding.

But connecting with Stuart tops all. It’s like a reward for being a book slut and a validation of the line I’ve quoted before: Time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.

Now, if I could parlay that “good book and old buddy” encounter into getting some kind of freebie for the summer reading program, I’d really know my luck as changed.

  - July 12, 2006

 

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