The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2009.03.18 The library needs you

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

On this past Sunday, beautiful and sunny, David and I set out on a walk to the high school track. Before we had gone one block, I probably mentioned five things that were problematic for me.

“Dang, my eyes are watering,” I said.

I hadn’t worn my glasses because my 51-year-old eyes aren’t that bad. But I’ve noticed lately that I need to wear them most of the time rather than just when I’m reading or working at the computer.

This state of eyeball failure is actually easier on me—I don’t lose my glasses anywhere near as much as I used to, which was pretty much all the time. Even though my glasses were fitted with progressive lenses, at first, I really only needed them for close-up tasks.

Now, as my eyes are getting progressively worse (Hmm, is that how progressive lenses got named?), I find that food looks better on my plate, I look decidedly worse (and much older) in the mirror, and my eyes don’t irritate me when I wear them most of the time.

In short, I must be getting blinder. Still, I don’t really like wearing glasses outdoors, except for when I’m riding my bike—they prevent the wind from blowing in my eyes. But sunglasses do the same thing.

“I should have worn my sunglasses,” I said to David and would have turned back, but that would have meant prolonging the agony that was to ensue—two miles around the track with 10 extra pounds on my carcass.

“Oh, now my nose is running,” I complained as I fished in my pocket for tissues.

We hadn’t even made it past Adam and Gail Johnson’s house and I was honking away, worried that my tissue supply wasn’t going to make it—runny nose compounded by tearing eyes would surely tax my 11-tissue stash.

Along about Patti Collar’s house my zipper got stuck (different coat, same color). I moaned and groaned until we reached East Street and I worked the kink out.

“It’s not just driving,” David said.

“What?” I had no idea what he was talking about. What did driving have to do with my zipper?

“It’s not just driving,” he said again.

“What’s not just driving?” What was he driving at? Was he having a stroke?

“It’s your life,” he said. “You have a special needs life.”

I laughed, but it is so true.

The night before, as I sat at the computer, he brought me a plate I had left on the kitchen table with two potato chips I wasn’t going to eat.

“Here you go,” he said. “Finish up.”

“Oh, I’m not going to eat those,” I said. “That one is too brown and this one is folded over and weird looking.”

He shook his head and took the plate away. I suspect he ate them in private—he doesn’t want to be tempted by pure junk food of no redeeming value, but he wants it just the same.

The next evening I poured a bunch of potato chips on my plate, a prelude to making pickle and potato chip sandwiches—the quintessential nostalgic snack of my childhood.

“Oh, you can’t eat that one!” David said pointing to a particularly funkily shaped chip. “It’s wrinkled!” And he plucked it from my plate.

It’s kind of like Woody Hayes, who, while battling diabetes, could proudly say he didn’t eat dessert because he didn’t order any in restaurants—he just ate it off of his players’ plates.

But none of this has anything to do with what I really set out to talk about...the Living Library.

Surely, you have read about the Living Library here in the Observer (the Books are people who represent stereotypes and Readers check out the Books for half an hour of conversation). Or maybe you’ve been accosted by me to be a Book or begged to come and be a Reader. If not, look out—because I’m really worried.

I’m worried my Books will Bail and my Readers won’t Respond and the Living Library will be a Big Bust.

Which is too bad because the Living Library concept is just so unique and noble—to promote understanding and tolerance through dialogue.

So, I am flat out begging you to come to Stair Public Library Saturday, March 28, some time between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. to check out a Book—or heck, just come and check it out.

Yup, David’s right. I do lead a needy life.

And I need you, Reader.

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