2006.06.28 Support kicks in after quarter century of marriage

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

I am not a supportive wife, especially when it comes to the Observer. Oh, I work ungodly hours on a Monday night, proofreading and laying out pages and writing the occasional story or column. And I handle the payroll and tax reporting and pay the bills. But when it comes to the really important stuff, I’ve not kept up my part of the marriage promise. Although...was agreeing to be a “yes man” part of the vows? If not, then I’m off the hook. I don’t really recall “I promise to keep quiet when I disagree” being part of the bargain.

Seems like society expects it, though—the “stand by your man” mentality. You’ve heard it said, I’m sure, “Behind every great man, there’s a great woman.” Poor David. That’s not true in his case. His greatness is all his own. I’m more likely to be described by the quote attributed to Jim Carrey, "Behind every great man is a woman rolling her eyes." I’m the one Jesus had in mind when he said, “O, ye of little faith.”

I think David knew what he was getting himself into right from the start. But on the cusp of our 25th year of marriage, as I take stock of our union and business, I’m feeling a little sheepish.

I recall one of David’s finest moments in journalism, the April 1, 1987 issue of the Observer when he wrote a fake story about Morenci being part of Ohio. He did some of that research during a family visit to the old Stair Public Library building. Ben was four and a half, Rozee was not quite a year old and they were both uncharacteristically running wild in the small quarters. I was ready to leave and I wanted David to get a move on. I remember walking up the steps to the reference section and urging him to hurry up. I thought he was spending too much time on a story that was boring as all get out. I didn’t take Michigan history in fourth grade. I was in New York City—in heaven with a new set of vibrant magic markers Mrs. Conrath’s husband was able to purchase for her students at a discount. I knew diddley about the Toledo War and a strip of land in exchange for the Upper Peninsula.

No one is going to care, I told him. It isn’t even funny.

Boy, was I ever wrong. That story is still the most talked about article ever, nearly 20 years later.

I thought his idea to ditch the broadsheet and embrace the tabloid size paper was a big mistake. That version seemed too much like the sensational blaring headline papers of my youth in New York. I missed By the Way on the front page. It didn’t seem like a “real” paper. But the move to tabloid saved the business. Likewise, I was weak-kneed at the idea of switching to paid subscription from free circulation and from private delivery to the U.S. mail. But those, too, panned out.

I’m hoping I can soon say the same about the “State Line Observer.” I still haven’t accepted that move and I grumble and mumble when it seems Fayette content is more than Morenci’s. Oh, every now and then I concede that Fayette does something or other better than Morenci and we can learn from them (their library has some great programs, for example), but most of the time I am thinking things like, why didn’t he take photos of Morenci’s T-ball kids? Sure, that was an excellent page of photos, capturing the essence of five-year-olds and the sport of baseball, but why Fayette kids?

And for weeks, he was working on developing statelineobserver.com and I never even went to the site. He’d mention something and I didn’t have a clue what he was talking about. Heck, he’s been working on it for months, I see as I click backward in time to read his postings.

Now that I’ve looked it over, I must say, this is the coolest thing. Sure, you can get news on the site. But it’s the blog that makes this site special. The breadth of subjects that pique his interest, the humor, the concern for the environment, it’s a pretty complete look at the complex man I married. It’s like a daily letter from David, and just like the days before we were married, when I looked forward to a letter bearing the Morenci postmark, there’s always something interesting or funny or quirky in his postings. You never know what you’re going to get.

It’s a dose of David Green every day.

Sure to cure what ails you.

– June 28, 2006
  • Front.nok Hok
    GAMES DAY—Finn Molitierno (right) celebrates a goal during a game of Nok Hockey with his sister, Kyla. The two tried out a variety of games Saturday at Stair District Library’s annual International Games Day event. One of the activities featured a sort of scavenger hunt in which participants had to locate facts presented in the Smithsonian Hometown Teams exhibit. The traveling show left Morenci’s library Tuesday, wrapping up a series of programs that began Oct. 2. Additional photos are on page 7.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.leaves
    MAPLE leaves show their fall colors in a puddle at Morenci’s Riverside Natural Area. “This was a great year for colors,” said local weather watcher George Isobar. Chilly mornings will give way to seasonable fall temperatures for the next two weeks.
  • Front.band
    MORENCI Marching Band member Brittany Dennis keeps the beat Friday during the half-time show of the Morenci/Pittsford football game. Color guard member Jordan Cordts is at the left. The band performed this season under the direction of Doyle Rodenbeck who served as Morenci’s band director in the 1970s. He’s serving as a substitute during a family leave.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.

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