The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2008.08.20 Don't now nuthin' 'bout buying lingerie

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

I knew, as soon as the car pulled out of the driveway, that I had left the cell phone in the house. But I figured I was with David and the kids were all wherever they were—I didn’t need to worry about anybody.

So, I didn’t yell, “Wait a minute! I forgot something,” as I am wont to do whenever we set out on any journey. This journey was only to Sylvania for dinner and then the mall to buy a present for our future daughter-in-law’s lingerie shower.

It wasn’t until we passed by the Sarnacs’ house on Morenci Road, that it hit me—I need that phone to consult with Rozee or Maddie about what to buy Sarah. I knew we had exceeded the distance beyond which David would be willing to backtrack, so I kept quiet.

After dinner, we headed to the mall, but David couldn’t be budged to come inside and help me with this purchase at Victoria’s Secret.

“What do I know about lingerie?” I asked. “What the heck is lingerie, anyway?”

“Pajamas,” he said.

“C’mon, come with me!” I begged. But he begged off, and settled in with the only book I had brought with me, “The Borrowers.”

I berated myself for forgetting the cell phone—Rozee or Maddie would have talked me through this task, guiding me to the right garments—instead, poor Sarah would be faced with trying to act pleased about whatever I picked out. I rationalized that she could return the purchase, but I didn’t want to burden her with the hassle.

I entered the store through the collegiate clothing section and immediately was drawn to a cottony looking pink striped little dress sort of thing with ruffles. It looked like something Sarah would like.

Then the clerk asked me what I was shopping for today and instead replying with my usual, “Oh, I’m just looking,” I figured I could use any help I could get—obviously, none would be forthcoming from my husband.

I told her I was shopping for my future daughter-in-law’s lingerie shower and she directed me to the next section—the land of “Holey Moley!”

I almost burst out laughing. I could not see myself buying a, a, uh, aw, heck, I don’t know what the heck they are called, but they are full of lace and ribbons and black netty stuff and cover the torso of a woman’s body.

I was just about in the “get me out of here” stage, contemplating sending Maddie to the mall in Ann Arbor to do my bidding, when I discovered a few more rooms of more modest undergarments.

I was fingering one skimpy little thing when a man sidled up to me and burped in my ear. It almost brought the Bronx out of me, but I recognized the burp as that of my husband.

“What are you doing here?” I asked.

“Your book wasn’t any good,” he said.

“What do you think of this for Sarah?” I asked, holding out a skimpy thing that didn’t seem quite like a slip, but I don’t know what else it would be called.

“Yeah, that looks like Sarah,” he said decisively.

That was all the endorsement I needed and we headed for the checkout counter, choosing the faster-looking of two lines. Then something caught my eye and I handed David the garment.

“Here, hold this and stand in line,” I said. “I’ll be right back.”

I walked over to look at something else that looked like Sarah and suddenly a man was by my side, whispering in my ear.

The man, of course, was my husband—not standing in line.

“What the heck are you doing?” I asked.

I turned to the line. “Look at that! Two more people are in front of us now! You were supposed to stand there and hold my place in line!”

I couldn’t believe it! Rozee and Maddie would never do something like that!

“Are you in a hurry or something?” he asked, which brought me up short, because, no, I wasn’t in a hurry.

Still, I didn’t want to spend time standing in line at Victoria’s Secret when I could be standing in line at Handel’s ice cream store for a mint chocolate chip Handel Pop, the nearest thing to heaven.

He was right, there was no reason to be ticked off at him, so I let go of his shirt, stopped beating him up over wayward shopping behavior and we made it out of the mall without further incident.

“What the heck did I buy anyway?” I asked David on our way to the car.

“Pajamas,” he said.

When Sarah opens this present and says, “Thank you,” I’m going to use one of Liz Stella’s famous lines, uttered whenever she gives something wonderful such as a loaf of her homemade bread and honey, downplaying her generosity.

“Oh, it’s just a little bit of nuthin’!”

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