2008.07.23 Nibbling away at my sole

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

In preparation for Rozee’s wedding, my daughters accompanied me to Sephora at the mall in Toledo. Sephora sells make-up and lots of it. I was hoping for a consultation, reformation, transformation—anything to take away the bags under my eyes and the odd patches of discolored skin that make me wonder, “Who is that woman?” when I look in the mirror.

Rozee doubted that they would provide that service, but when I walked in the store, the first salesperson I saw asked, “What can I help you with?”

“Everything!” I said. “I need it all!”

She proceeded to do the works. From some kind of eye cream with light diffusers to Buxum lip polish for “pout-plumping perfection,” she tested various colors until she found the ones that matched my skin the best.

She explained everything she was doing and applied only moderate amounts of each product. When she was done, I thought, “Hey, it almost IS magic!” You might recall that Maddie once said it WASN’T magic when I complained her make-up wasn’t getting rid of my bags.

“I’ll take it all,” I said, much to my daughters’ amazement. I figured I’ve gone a good 35 years not buying much more than lip balm. Whatever it cost to purchase all this make-up magic would average out to not much overall.

A couple years ago I did buy some Burt’s Bees lipstick that I thought was lip balm. I bought one each for Rozee, Maddie and myself for stocking stuffers. On Christmas morning, when we were all gathered on my and David’s bed rooting through our stockings, I slathered my lips up and down and around with Burt’s Bees. When the kids looked up from their stockings, they burst into laughter at the sight of their mother looking like a clown.

Lately, though, my real problem is on the other end of my body: my feet.

My husband has the most amazing feet, especially his heels. So soft, so smooth. So like a baby’s bottom.

I was examining his feet in relation to mine and was shocked at the difference.

My feet are wicked, rugged affairs. The tips of my toes are cracked and rough, but my heels are so bad they could grind the paint off a car door. They rip the threads off our couch cushions, so I have to throw down a blanket before I put up my feet.

Every now and then I put lotion on my feet at night and wear socks to bed. A few days of this and they’re restored to somewhat normalcy. But it’s too hot to do that in the summer and too many days of gardening in sandals kicks them back into grinder mode again anyway.

Besides, those rough heels are great for scratching the mosquito bites on my toes. I swear those mosquitoes just zero in on my feet like it’s the only good piece of meat around.

David was pretty shocked at the extent of damage to my heels. Monday morning when I checked e-mail, I knew he was thinking of me.

The link he sent?

“Fish pedicures: Carp rid human feet of scaly skin.”

The article described a spa in northern Virginia where they have pools of fish that nibble the feet of customers, $35 for 15 minutes and $50 for 30 minutes.

John Ho, who runs the salon with his wife, was looking for a replacement for razors used to scrape off dead skin.

 "The best pedicure I ever had,” said one customer. “This was the first time somebody got rid of my calluses completely.”

The “somebody” is little carp called garra rufa or doctor fish.

The article quotes a podiatrist who doubts the practice will become widespread. But, he probably hasn’t tried it himself.

A first-time customer’s apprehension “dissolved into laughter after she put her feet in the tank and the fish swarmed to her toes. ‘It's a little ticklish, actually,’ she said.”

There are no state laws regulating fish pedicures, but the county health department made the salon switch from a shallow communal pool to individual tanks for each customer.

“The communal pool also presented its own problem: At times the fish would flock to the feet of an individual with a surplus of dead skin, leaving others with a dearth of fish.

"It would sometimes be embarrassing for them but it was also really hilarious," Ho said.

I thought it was pretty funny, too, imagining all the fish at my feet if I were in the communal pool.

“That’s hilarious about the fish,” I said to David later Monday.

“The fish?” he asked.

“Nibbling your feet,” I prompted, and he registered a look of recognition.

“You think it’s an April Fool’s joke?” I asked.

“No, it’s August,” he said. “July,” he corrected himself.

“I shave mine,” he said. “You could use yours for a cheese grater.”

  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Front.sculpta
    SCULPTORS—Morenci third grade students Emersyn Thompson (left) and Marissa Lawrence turn spaghetti sticks into mini sculptures Friday during a class visit to Stair District Library. All Morenci Elementary School classes recently visited the library to experience the creative construction toys purchased through the “Sculptamania!” project, funded by a Disney Curiosity Creates grant. The grant is administered by the Association for Library Services to Children, a division of the American Library Association.
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • Shadow.salon
    LEARNING THE ROPES—Kristy Castillo (left), co-owner of Mane Street Salon, works with Kendal Kuhn as Sierra Orner takes a phone call. The two Morenci Area High School juniors spent Friday at the salon as part of a job shadowing experience.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016