The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2007.07.25 Singing in the pain? Heed Dr. Seuss' advice

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

I was in the living room reading a children’s book aloud a week ago Tuesday night, practicing for the Summer Reading Program. It was late. It was 4:20 a.m., to be exact, when I heard the sound of fingers snapping. I realized it was David. He was hanging over the upstairs bannister snapping his fingers to get my attention. I suppose he didn’t want to talk so he wouldn’t wake up Maddie.

“I know,” I said, thinking he was trying to communicate that it was very late and I should go to bed.

“I hear you,” I said. “But I can’t stop yet.” I was timing myself, checking to see how long it would take to read, “On Top of Spaghetti.” I wanted to see if I could squeeze in reading another book before the Summer Reading kids started their craft and made a snack.

“On Top of Spaghetti” is a wonderful book and includes the rousing lyrics to that old favorite song. Even though it wasn’t on topic for Pie Day at the library, it’s a fun book and since we would only meet one more time after this one, I knew I’d have to read it last week if I wanted to read all my favorites to the children.

A little while later when I slid into bed I could tell David was still awake.

“What are you doing up so late?” I asked.

“I thought I heard you cry out in pain,” he said. “I was going to see what was the matter.”

I didn’t know if I should be offended by his opinion of my rendition of “On Top of Spaghetti” or touched that he was concerned I might be hurt. Neither really. I just laughed and slugged him in the chest. 

But, he’s aptly described my voice. I really can’t sing. And every VolunTeen and first through sixth grader who attended the Summer Reading Program last week could verify that fact.  Or just ask my daughter Maddie. I think she’s the child who used to cover my mouth when I held her in my arms and sang lullabies at night.

Whenever I used to hear that Genesis song, I Can’t Dance, on the radio I felt such kinship with its writer. I loved to sing along in my really bad voice. They just seemed to go hand in hand, the lyrics and my voice.


 No, I can't dance, I can't talk.

 The only thing about me is the way I walk.

 No, I can't dance, I can't sing

 I'm just standing here selling everything.


 But I can walk.

 No I can't dance.

 No no no I can't dance

 No I said I can't sing.

 But I can walk.

I’m getting more and more faithful to that quote I’ve mentioned before: “If a thing is worth doing, it’s worth doing poorly.” Singing songs like “On Top of Spaghetti” is just plain fun and everybody should get in on the fun even if they aren’t going to win American Idol.

I wonder what effect that show has on kids. Does it make them feel inhibited about singing, fearing that a Simon Cowell in the group will judge them harshly? Or does it make them want to sing all the more to improve enough to make it to the big time?

It was great last week to hear the younger kids in the program, the first and second graders, sing along with me and not worry about how they sound. Of course, compared to me they sound fine and dandy. And lucky for everyone, they did a decent job drowning out my voice,

The older kids, those going into third through sixth grade aren’t so eager to join in. It’s the age where it starts, that kids think everyone is looking at them, listening to them, waiting to pass judgment and tease and comment on every little thing.

They need to heed Dr. Seuss’ advice: “Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don’t matter, and those who matter don’t mind.”

And those who judge and tease and comment should keep in mind another Seuss quote: “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

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