The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

2003.11.05 Life serves up a scoop of the unexpected

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

The only hope for me in this life is that I sincerely want to be a better person. I want to be more organized and get more accomplished in a day. I want be a member of the early-to-bed, early-to-rise club. I want to do the things you’re supposed to do in a logical, sensible, efficient fashion. Really, I have good intentions. But then I do things that make me question if I’ll ever use my time wisely.

I know it’s outright absurd to head to Toledo at 3:45 p.m. on a Sunday to go shopping at the mall, especially when you think the mall closes at 5, but I do it anyway. It’s pleasant to discover the mall closes at 6, but it’s such a waste of gas to go that far and spend so little time there, darting from store to store with your daughters. You can’t help but wonder if the purchase of brilliant yellow shoes with silver stripes will lead to buyer’s remorse. Perhaps if we’d had a little more time, they would have seemed a touch too bright and remained on the shelf.

We dash to Target and proceed to Meijer’s, trying to cram as much shopping in before heading home at 8. But first, a pit stop for sweet treats at Beaner’s coffee shop, on, hmm, is it McCord? We find our way to Sylvania Rd. and I direct Rosie to drive west. After some distance, I sense that she is changing lanes. She’s merely moving out of the “right turn only” lane, but I think she’s heading south to Meijer’s.

I look up from the magazine I’m reading, quickly glance around assessing our location, and scream, “No, no! Go right! Turn right here! We want to go to Beaner’s!” But I’m obviously disoriented because when we turn right, Beaner’s is not in sight. We are on the wrong street. Maddy, who had noticed an ice cream parlor before we made the turn, is thrilled. Back when I was yelling “turn right,” she was yelling, “Forget Beaner’s, let’s go there! They have ice cream!”

We find ourselves in the parking lot of Barry’s Bagels and wend our way into the ice cream parlor parking lot. What the heck, it’s not often we can make Maddy happy in the food department. We bound out of the vehicle to discover a great ice cream joint, Handel’s Homemade Ice Cream and Yogurt. Right away, I find the most exciting item on the menu: a Handel’s Pop, a scoop of mint chocolate chip ice cream on a popcicle stick, dipped in Belgian dark chocolate.

I can’t tell you the history of the place, except that it was started in 1945 by some woman. That’s as far as I got reading from the paper pasted on the side window. It was one of those long, wide paragraphs, like Rosie’s practice AP English tests. Long, single spaced paragraphs just make my eyes glaze over. When I took social science policy classes at MSU’s James Madison College, we had to read original works and they always had just massive paragraphs filled with many big words looped together in a fashion that made you wonder if this really was English you were reading. I’m sure it was really great writing of perhaps great literary worth, but frankly, if  a book doesn’t have a pretty cover, I’m not picking it up unless it comes highly recommended. But, we were eating ice cream...

“This is serendipity, you know,” I say, as the three of us sit on a bench in front of Handel’s, blissfully enjoying our treats.

“We never got to eat there,” Rosie reminds me. Serendipity is the name of an ice cream parlor restaurant in New York City where we almost spent a lot of money, but David refused to wait 40 minutes to get seated.

“No, I meant that we ended up here unexpectedly and it all worked out really well,” I say.

Later, I look up the definition of serendipity (the gift of finding valuable or agreeable things not sought for) and have one of those “ah ha!” moments. A new life plan! I shouldn’t seek to be a better person. I should just let the forces of serendipity unfold. Don’t look for it and it will come to you.

It works for ice cream.

    – Nov. 5, 2003 

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