2007.06.27 Secret life on the couch

Written by David Green.


Well, I’ll be jiggered.

That’s all I have to say.

Well, of course, not exactly or that would be the end of this column. But, I’ve been slightly blown away that there is a whole book on what my last column was somewhat about.

I had heard of the book, “The Secret.” In my other life at the library, I had ordered it for patrons through interlibrary loan. It was mentioned at the Rural Libraries Conference Liz and I attended early last month. And it’s probably been the talk of the town since it’s an Oprah endorsed book and on the New York Times bestseller list. Somehow we missed buying it for the library. I was about to send the interloan copy back to the lending library, but decided to take it home for a quick look. What a surprise I had.

All this time I just thought I was a bit bizarre. That things kept happening to me, that I could make patrons come into the library to pick up a book they’d requested just by thinking of them. That I could start to call someone and they would walk in the door. That I could think about a friend I hadn’t heard from in a while and she would call out of the blue. My life has always seemed like a series of coincidences. I didn’t know I was secretly living the secret and exercising the law of attraction.

That’s the Great Secret of Life, says author Rhonda Byrne. “The law of attraction says ‘like attracts like’ so when you think a thought you are also attracting like thoughts to you.”

She says thoughts are magnetic and have a frequency. As your thoughts are sent out  into the universe they attract all like things on the same frequency. We’re like transmission towers transmitting a frequency with our thoughts, she says. If we want to change anything in our lives, we simply change the frequency by changing our thoughts. What you think about the most will appear as your life.

Obviously I need to set my sights a little higher. Just imagine what my life could be like if I concentrated less on patrons picking up requested books and put my attention on fame and fortune.

Even though the book is really just a rehash of everything related to the power of positive thinking, it’s quite invigorating to consider the workings and magic of the thought process. I’ve been intrigued by thoughts for a long time. I can recall wondering where thoughts go and what thoughts are made of as far back as high school days. I remember being jealous that my friend Brian was going to study the brain. I would have loved to, but the thought of taking all that math and science? Ugh. If only I’d had this book back then.

There is lots of good stuff in “The Secret,” especially about being grateful. But I hit a point where it got to be too much, too materialistic and too simplistic. How do you explain away millions of people living in poverty? They got themselves there by not thinking the right thoughts? I think that’s a dangerous mentality. Poverty is way more complex and many other factors are at work way beyond the control of poor people. And why should we want to focus so much on getting material things? When the claims started getting a bit outlandish (Think thin like the author and go from 143 to 116 pounds) she started losing me.

I don’t agree entirely with one Barnes and Noble customer reviewer who said, “It's perhaps enjoyable, however, to the inherently stupid, the mildly literate, and the absolutely gullible,” but I might advise reading another interloaned book: “Change Your Life Without Getting Out of Bed: the ultimate nap book” by SARK.

It’s a pretty little book with lots of colorful watercolor illustrations mixed with handwritten text and it covers the issues of napping in chapters ranging from “Pleasure and Benefits of Napping” to “Napping is Productive.”  And, if you think the author of “The Secret” is all wet, turn to this chapter for a different approach to building wealth—The More Naps You Take the More Money You Make.

I’m heading for the couch right now.

    – June 27, 2007 
  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.base Ball
    UMPIRE Thomas Henthorn tosses the bat between team captains Mikayla Price and Chuck Piskoti of Flint’s Lumber City Base Ball Club. Following the 1860 rules, after the bat was grabbed by the captains, captains’ hands advanced to the top of the bat—one hand on top of the other. The captain whose hand ended up on top decided who would bat first. Additional photos of Sunday’s game appear on page 12 of this week’s Observer. The contest was organized in conjunction with Stair District Library’s Hometown Teams exhibit that runs through Nov. 20.
  • Front.chat
    VALUE OF ATHLETICS—Morenci graduate John Bancroft (center) takes a turn at the microphone during a chat session at the opening of the Hometown Teams exhibit at Stair District Library. Clockwise to his left is John Dillon, Jed Hall, Jim Bauer, Joe Farquhar, George Hollstein, George Vereecke and Mike McDowell. Thomas Henthorn (at the podium) kicked off the conversation. Henthorn, a University of Michigan–Flint professor, will return to Morenci this Sunday to lead a game of vintage base ball at the school softball field.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.crossing
    Crossing over—Jim Heiney was given a U.S. flag to carry by George Vereecke (behind Jim in the hat), turning him into the leader of the parade. Bridge Walk participants cross over Bean Creek while, in the background, members of the Morenci Legion Riders cross the main traffic bridge on East Street South. Additional photos appear on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016