2007.06.27 Secret life on the couch

Written by David Green.

By COLLEEN LEDDY

Well, I’ll be jiggered.

That’s all I have to say.

Well, of course, not exactly or that would be the end of this column. But, I’ve been slightly blown away that there is a whole book on what my last column was somewhat about.

I had heard of the book, “The Secret.” In my other life at the library, I had ordered it for patrons through interlibrary loan. It was mentioned at the Rural Libraries Conference Liz and I attended early last month. And it’s probably been the talk of the town since it’s an Oprah endorsed book and on the New York Times bestseller list. Somehow we missed buying it for the library. I was about to send the interloan copy back to the lending library, but decided to take it home for a quick look. What a surprise I had.

All this time I just thought I was a bit bizarre. That things kept happening to me, that I could make patrons come into the library to pick up a book they’d requested just by thinking of them. That I could start to call someone and they would walk in the door. That I could think about a friend I hadn’t heard from in a while and she would call out of the blue. My life has always seemed like a series of coincidences. I didn’t know I was secretly living the secret and exercising the law of attraction.

That’s the Great Secret of Life, says author Rhonda Byrne. “The law of attraction says ‘like attracts like’ so when you think a thought you are also attracting like thoughts to you.”

She says thoughts are magnetic and have a frequency. As your thoughts are sent out  into the universe they attract all like things on the same frequency. We’re like transmission towers transmitting a frequency with our thoughts, she says. If we want to change anything in our lives, we simply change the frequency by changing our thoughts. What you think about the most will appear as your life.

Obviously I need to set my sights a little higher. Just imagine what my life could be like if I concentrated less on patrons picking up requested books and put my attention on fame and fortune.

Even though the book is really just a rehash of everything related to the power of positive thinking, it’s quite invigorating to consider the workings and magic of the thought process. I’ve been intrigued by thoughts for a long time. I can recall wondering where thoughts go and what thoughts are made of as far back as high school days. I remember being jealous that my friend Brian was going to study the brain. I would have loved to, but the thought of taking all that math and science? Ugh. If only I’d had this book back then.

There is lots of good stuff in “The Secret,” especially about being grateful. But I hit a point where it got to be too much, too materialistic and too simplistic. How do you explain away millions of people living in poverty? They got themselves there by not thinking the right thoughts? I think that’s a dangerous mentality. Poverty is way more complex and many other factors are at work way beyond the control of poor people. And why should we want to focus so much on getting material things? When the claims started getting a bit outlandish (Think thin like the author and go from 143 to 116 pounds) she started losing me.

I don’t agree entirely with one Barnes and Noble customer reviewer who said, “It's perhaps enjoyable, however, to the inherently stupid, the mildly literate, and the absolutely gullible,” but I might advise reading another interloaned book: “Change Your Life Without Getting Out of Bed: the ultimate nap book” by SARK.

It’s a pretty little book with lots of colorful watercolor illustrations mixed with handwritten text and it covers the issues of napping in chapters ranging from “Pleasure and Benefits of Napping” to “Napping is Productive.”  And, if you think the author of “The Secret” is all wet, turn to this chapter for a different approach to building wealth—The More Naps You Take the More Money You Make.

I’m heading for the couch right now.

    – June 27, 2007 
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Front.sculpta
    SCULPTORS—Morenci third grade students Emersyn Thompson (left) and Marissa Lawrence turn spaghetti sticks into mini sculptures Friday during a class visit to Stair District Library. All Morenci Elementary School classes recently visited the library to experience the creative construction toys purchased through the “Sculptamania!” project, funded by a Disney Curiosity Creates grant. The grant is administered by the Association for Library Services to Children, a division of the American Library Association.
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • Shadow.salon
    LEARNING THE ROPES—Kristy Castillo (left), co-owner of Mane Street Salon, works with Kendal Kuhn as Sierra Orner takes a phone call. The two Morenci Area High School juniors spent Friday at the salon as part of a job shadowing experience.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016