2003.12.03 Get me out of storage

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

I felt as though I was part of a movie Friday morning, but it was the sort of movie you would want to watch from the comfort of your living room.

We were in Brooklyn, N.Y., last weekend for a brief visit to the big city. My wife really wanted to spend Thanksgiving with one of her sisters, so we headed east Wednesday.

We reached the George Washington Bridge in 10 hours, then skirted along the edge of Manhattan, dove under the East River through the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel, and made our way on to Linda’s apartment near Coney Island.

Thanksgiving Day was good. We shopped in a Chinese supermarket that included several tanks of live fish. We stopped in a Russian grocery and walked out with “raisin sausage” and kefir. 86th Street was busy with shoppers. Thanksgiving probably wasn’t a traditional holiday for most of them.

The next morning, while the others showered and dressed, I agreed to drive Linda to her storage unit so she could bring her Christmas tree home.

Linda directed me across town a few blocks to a large building with a sign that read “Stop and Stor.” OK, but where are the storage units?

We turned in the drive and faced a pair of iron gates and a crossing arm like at a railroad intersection. Linda gave me the code to punch into a keypad and the gates began to part. The arm rose and we proceeded past an enormous multi-story building on the right and a smaller two-story structure to the left. This was just the beginning.

We drove on and on alongside rows of two-story buildings with roads turning off to the side every so often toward other buildings. Finally I was told to turn left down a road that led between rows of buildings. Occasionally a drive would appear that led back into the guts of the place for 30 or 40 feet.

We turned right, then left, then right, to where I backed up into a drive that led to Linda’s building. There were roll-down doors everywhere—some were vehicle size, others were just big enough for a person could walk through, if the roll-down metal door were open. Hmmm, the door to Linda’s unit was already open. There were no other cars around, but her building was ready for visitors.

We walked in and climbed the stairs to the second floor. Here we entered a labyrinth of cold, metal clad hallways. Floors, walls, doors—everything was shiny metal and we echoed as we walked. We made a left, then another and another and finally a right to Linda’s door.

I looked around while she got out her key and worked the lock. It was simple enough. Iron beams were exposed along the ceiling. Dozens of small rooms had been constructed inside. It looked plenty secure, but it also looked a little ominous.

I've probably watched too many movies. The door was already opened. There was somebody already in this building, somewhere down one of these cold, lonely hallways. What were they waiting for—some sucker from the Midwest whose decomposing body would be found days later in one of these dozens and dozens of little metal rooms?

So there wasn’t really anybody else up there, at least no one we ever saw. Linda wasn’t bothered by the open door. In fact, she saw it as a gift—one less lock to mess with.

We removed the plastic bin containing the body of her...containing her artificial Christmas tree. We carried it down the stairs to the car and drove back out through the alleyways and through another pair of iron gates.

Brooklyn, with its 2.3 million people, is just a part of New York City. If it were a city on its own, it would rank as the country’s fourth largest. It’s said that one out of seven American citizens can trace their family history through the streets of Brooklyn, and it’s likely my ancestors walked around here when they first reached the United States.

Now, a century and a half later, all of Morenci could store its belongings in the Stop and Stor on Shore Parkway, the one overlooking Gravesend Bay. Once Morenci moved in, there would still be room for Fayette and Lyons and Seneca....and even that missing shipment of the letter "e."

    – Dec. 3, 2003 
  • Front.geese
    ON THE MOVE—Six goslings head out on manuevers with their parents in an area lake. Baby waterfowl are showing up in lakes and ponds throughout the area.
  • Front.little Ball
    Fayette's Demetrious Whiteside (left)Skylar Lester attempt to keep the ball from going out of bounds during Morenci's recent basketball tournament for fourth and fifth grade teams. Morenci's Andrew Schmidt stands by.
  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2017