2002.07.24 Looking back with Maude

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Other than the fact that 30 years have passed since then, 1972 doesn’t seem like such a long time ago. I was just finishing up college, and that’s still pretty fresh in my mind.

And since it was such recent history, I was really surprised to read that local Saturday night shopping ended in 1972.

I discovered that fact when I was doing the “Morenci Through the Decades” feature that appears on page 2 each week. It gets a little time consuming to come up with those 16 items each week (especially in the weeks past when there wasn’t much going on), but I would never choose to give up that part of this newspaper job.

It’s good to keep watch on local history (even though it’s only the past 50 years that I cover), and it’s a good source of entertainment and amusement.

When I found the store closing item, I thought I might write something about it later. I went back to the story over the weekend and couldn’t find it. Very puzzling. It was just here a couple of days ago.

The problem is that I went back to 1962. I don’t remember stores staying open until 9 p.m. in 1962, but they did and I was 10 years off. On July 27, 1972, Winzeler’s 5¢ to $1 Store, Western Auto, Gillen’s Hardware, Allen’s Jewelry, Gamble Store and Brink’s Shoe Repair announced they would join several other local businesses that had already started to close on Saturday nights. Meyer’s Department Store was a hold-out. They would keep their late hours.

Those six stores would continue with their 9 p.m. Friday closing schedule, but I don’t even remember “everybody” staying open until 9 p.m. on Fridays in 1972.

Time flies when you’re having an odd time.

I recall hearing stories about Saturday nights in earlier decades when the farmers would all come to town and shop and spit tobacco into the street. That’s what I was told. They would gather on the downtown sidewalk to talk (while the wives did the shopping) and they would spit their tobacco in a lovely arc over the sidewalk and into the street. Of course that was a highly illegal activity just as it is today.

Back in former times, Morenci didn’t have the steps along West Main Street like we have today. Those were constructed in 1953. Up until that time, there was sort of a wall of concrete at the edge of the sidewalk down to the street, but that was a relic of horse and buggy days.

City council members decided to add the steps because when drivers parallel parked on Main Street, the passenger door couldn’t be opened. By cutting back three feet from the road, one or two steps could be built.

Those are the same steps that are soon to be removed in the Main Street reconstruction project. City clerk/administrator Renée Schroeder says the state highway department is giving the city a hard time about removing those historic steps. Now she can let them know that the step era goes back less than 50 years.

New sidewalks were installed along the entire south side of Main Street in 1953 and those, too, will soon be replaced.

I suppose all this stuff reads as history to my kids, but I like to go further back in time via the old Maude Chase columns. Now that’s Morenci history.

Maude covered a wide range of information in a typical column. I have one here from 1952 where she started out writing about the Red Ribbon Temperance movement in 1912. More than 1,100 people “signed the pledge”—presumably to stay away from alcohol.

By the second paragraph, she’s jumped back to 1871 when, as she put it, Morenci moved out of the stage coach era due to the arrival of the Canada Southern railroad. There was a big celebration when North Street was broken for the rail crossing. The orator of the day, Rev. O.J. Perrin, presented “a brilliant vision of the future greatness of our village.”

Maude wrote that there was a hive of industry here in the 1860s and Morenci appeared to have a great industrial future. Part of that vision was the Canada Southern. The rail line was projected to run from Buffalo to Chicago. It made it to Morenci and crossed over the Bean behind Kellogg & Buck roller mill, then headed west out of town to Fayette.

But did it get much farther? Competition among rail lines was fierce in those days, and not too many years passed until Morenci’s line merged with the New York Central. Passenger service ended here in 1938 and freight service dwindled in the next 40 years.

Maude then went on to praise the town’s pioneers for all they did, and she suggests that people might want to commune with them at Oak Grove Cemetery. She finishes with a poem for Morenci that’s excerpted here: “In our heart of hearts there’s no fairer town, with pride and cheer we hail thy good renown. May all thy future years be those of thrift. From the way of progress may thou ne’er drift, thus greet at other times with welcome tongue, thy sons still boys, thy daughters always young.”

    – July 24, 2002 

 

  • Homecoming Court
    HOMECOMING—One senior candidate will be chosen Morenci’s fall homecoming queen during half-time ceremonies Friday at the football field. In the back row are seniors Mikayla Price, who will be escorted by Mason Vaughn; Madison Bachman, escorted by Kiegan Merillat, and Mikayla Reinke, escorted by Griffin Grieder. Senior Ariana Roseman is absent from the photo. Her escort is Garrett Smith. In the front is sophomore Abbie White, who will be escorted by Ryder Price; junior Madysen Schmitz, escorted by Harley McCaskey and freshman Madison Keller, escorted by Jarett Cook.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.crossing
    Crossing over—Jim Heiney was given a U.S. flag to carry by George Vereecke (behind Jim in the hat), turning him into the leader of the parade. Bridge Walk participants cross over Bean Creek while, in the background, members of the Morenci Legion Riders cross the main traffic bridge on East Street South. Additional photos appear on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.
  • Front.starting
    BIKE-A-THON—Children in Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program brought their bikes last Tuesday to participate in a bike-a-thon. Riders await the start of the event at the elementary school before being led on a course through town by organizer Leonie Leahy.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016