2007.03.28 The year was 1937

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

There’s that old saying about “the more things change, the more they stay the same,” but I don’t know. Things have really changed in the past 70 years.

Jean Oberling brought in an Observer from 1937 and it was interesting enough that I went to the archives over in the corner and brought out the entire year. Now I’ve been lost in the past this morning.

There is a lot staying the same. My grandfather was publisher of the paper in 1937 and my father was a freshman on the junior varsity football team.

School events, bowling leagues, shows at the Rex Theatre, church programs and local tragedies—they’re still a staple of small-town newspapers in 2007, but even these events are different.

Here’s a description of “Cain and Mabel” showing at the Rex: “The picture is said to be filled with catchy musical airs and gigantic specialty numbers in which one hundred and sixty beautiful chorus girls take part.” What kind of a crowd would that show draw today?

The high school basketball team defeated Addison 19-11 and not a single basket was scored in the first half. One of the reporters from the school newspaper (Mary Adelaide Kellogg, editor) wrote: “In the last quarter, many tempers were stirred up.”

The town bowling team competed against Hudson, car/train accidents were rather common, and the Boy Scout troop numbered 28 kids.

Dic-a-Doo was selling for 23¢ a pound at Mac’s Grocery & Market (“Cleans like magic”), Wheaties were priced at two for 25¢ at Murphy’s Market and Swaney’s offered the new Ford V-8 60 for $595.

Morenci chief of police Pete Stetten earned $9 a week, the same as W.H. Murray who served as Riverside Park caretaker. O.C. VanFossen, the cemetery supervisor, was paid twice that amount.

Bus service from Morenci to Detroit opened in 1937. The Extension Service gave a class in Medina about hitching an unbroken horse for the first time.

City council voted to buy shotgun shells for citizens to shoot at the invading starlings. A three-year-old girl was injured when her right arm was caught in the wringer of her mother’s electric washing machine. Petitions were collected in Medina Township for REA to set up electrical lines.

The Taft Highway tourist route from Michigan to Florida was nearly established all the way south, but there was talk of an east-west route from Toledo to Elkhart that also would pass through Morenci.

This would follow the old Vistula Road (Territorial Highway) that was thought to be the oldest road in the Midwest. There were records of French Jesuits taking the route in 1710.

Morenci’s school board wanted to build a new school with the help of a federal grant that would cover nearly half the cost. Voters said “no.”

Otis Harrington, who lived northwest of Fayette, put his team of horses to pasture and they disappeared over night. Finally they were found at the bottom of a 12-foot pit—an old well that had been sodded over 20 years earlier at a former cheese factory.

The oddity continued in the next week’s paper when a person at the fertilizer company noticed the horses had also been struck by lightning.

In February, a 90-year-old man married a 51-year-old woman. The old Civil War veteran said he preferred marrying a much younger woman than himself “as it costs money for funerals.”

In March, the city shook for about 12 seconds from an earthquake centered somewhere to the south. A salesman at Hart Hardware in Seneca said there was no jarring in the store, but there was a roaring sound like a heavy gust of wind.

One week later, a second quake rattled buildings in town.

Optimism was running high in small town America and a front page article reprinted from another paper made fun of a prophet of doom who predicted the decline of the small town.

Morenci was still growing and boasted of several car dealers and grocery stores and a variety of other merchants. There was little need to leave town.

“Rural America will continue to grow and prosper as long as civilization endures,” wrote the columnist.

We’re still here, but so much has changed.

    – March 28, 2007 
  • Front.bridge Cross
    STEP BY STEP—Wyatt Stevens of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge Sunday during the Michigan DNR’s Great Outdoors Jamboree at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The Tecumseh Boy Scout Troop constructed the bridge again this year after taking a break in 2016. The Jamboree offered a variety of activities for a wide range of age groups. Morenci’s Stair District Library set up activities again this year and had visits with dozens of kids. See the back page for additional photos.
  • Front.bridge.17
    LEADING THE WAY—The Morenci Area High School marching band led the way across the pedestrian bridge on Morenci’s south side for the annual Labor Day Bridge Walk. The Band Boosters shared profits from the sale of T-shirts with the walk’s sponsor, the Morenci Area Chamber of Commerce. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.eclipse
    LOOKING UP—More than 200 people showed up at Stair District Library Monday afternoon to view the big celestial event with free glasses provided by a grant from the Space Science Institute. The library offered craft activities from noon to 1 p.m., refreshments including Cosmic Cake from Zingerman’s Bakehouse and a live viewing of the eclipse from NASA on a large screen. As the sky darkened slightly, more and more people moved outside to the sidewalk to take a look at the shrinking sun. If you missed it, hang on for the next total eclipse in 2024 as the path comes even closer to this area.
  • Cecil
    THE MAYOR—Cecil Schoonover poses with a collection of garden gnomes that mysteriously arrive and disappear from his property. Along with the gnomes, someone created the sign stating that he is the Mayor of Gnomesville. He hasn’t yet tracked down the people involved in the prank, but he’s having a good time with the mystery.
  • Front.rest
    TAKE A BREAK—Last Wednesday’s session of Stair District Library’s Summer Reading Program ended with a quiet period in a class presented by yoga instructor Melany Gladieux of Toledo. Children learned a variety of yoga poses in the main room at the library, then finished off the session relaxing. Additional photos are on page 7. Area children are invited to visit the library today when the Michigan Science Center presents a flight program at 11 a.m. and roller coasters at 1 p.m.
  • Front.batter
    THE DERBY—Tyler “Smallpox” Flakne of Minnesota’s Home Run League All-Stars goes for the fence Friday night during the National Wiffle League Association’s home run derby in Morenci. This year the wiffleball national tournament moved from Dublin, Ohio, to Morenci’s Wakefield Park. During the derby, competitors had two minutes to hit as many home runs as possible. The winner this year finished with 21. See page 6 and 7 for additional photos.
  • Front.green Screen
    OUT OF THIS WORLD—Elizabeth McFadden and Elise Christle pose in front of the green screen as VolunTeen Noah Gilson makes them appear as though they are standing on the Moon. More photos from the Stair District Library’s NASA @ My Library program are on page 12.
  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
  • Front.batter

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