The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

2002.10.09 Monsters under the bed

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

The world is such a safe place these days. You don’t agree? Terrorists, anthrax and nuclear bombs have you on edge? It could be much worse. At least there aren’t any bat-winged pterosaurs, griffins and cyclops lurking in the dark.

Science writer Michon Scott has poured through dozens of books to pull together a comprehensive listing of oddities from the past. His work, called “Strange Science,” outlines what he calls the rocky road to the modern study of prehistoric life.

The ancient Greeks were doing quite well in figuring out the past, Scott says. They knew that species changed over the years. They knew that some of the fossils they were finding were once animals that lived in very different environments. That is, if a fossilized fish were found in the neighborhood, it indicated that the area was once under water.

It was a different situation a few hundred years later in Europe. People were jailed, tortured and even burned to death for the heresy of suggesting that the world was more than a few thousand years old, for stating that a fossil represented a plant or animal that lived millions of years earlier.

That’s when mystery, superstition and monsters ruled.

YOU HAVE to remember that most people in medieval Europe never traveled far from home. There were no newspapers to report on world events, no radio and television to offer glimpses of the enormous planet.

And so something as familiar to us as an octopus became the fierce hydra or devil fish with multiple heads. Chop one off and two more would grow.

It wasn’t until the 1600s that fossilized shark teeth were correctly identified. Before that they were the tongues of serpents turned to stone by St. Paul.

Dragons were still much feared by Europeans in the 1600s, but in China they were very useful. Dragon bones (actually dinosaur fossils) were used to cure heart and liver problems and to ease constipation.

The ancient Greeks might have been on the right track to understanding past life, but they had plenty of detours. For example, they returned from visits to the Gobi Desert with fossilized bones of beaked dinosaurs, but they saw them as a griffin, a lion-sized, four-legged, winged animal with a sharp beak that viciously guarded a hoard of gold.

Sixteenth century Europeans thought that elephant bones were from the dreaded cyclops with a third eye. Other bones were thought to belong to the elusive unicorn. The flying reptiles of the dinosaur era became fierce, giant bats. But hold your tongue if you thought that humans evolved from apes. In 1619, Italian philosopher Lucilio Vanini was burned alive for making that suggestion.

IT DIDN’T help any that a host of con artists helped push people off track. In 1845, a man pieced together five fossil whales to form a sea monster.

During the American Depression, some Texans started carving dinosaur footprints to sell, and they decided to add some “fossilized” human footprints. According to Scott, there are people still falling for this fraud and trying to use it as proof that humans coexisted with dinosaurs.

That’s just a recent chapter in a long history of jokers and villains who carved fossils, attached jaw bones of apes to human skulls, and concocted realistic mermaids.

These beasts from the past are enough to bring back the fear of  the monster hiding in the closet or the creature waiting under the bed.

Michon Scott knows there have been plenty of mistakes made over the centuries, but he’s not foolish enough to think we know it all now. Some day in the future, he says, others will look back and get a laugh at our latest and greatest theories.

And just to play it safe, don’t let your foot hang over the edge of the bed.

    – Oct. 9, 2002 

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