2002.12.04 Free-range dog dilemma

Written by David Green.

If dogs run free, why can’t we?

                                - Bob Dylan


By DAN GREEN

Observer Editor Brother

Do you know where your dog is right now? I’m guessing that many Morenci citizens don’t.

I’ve been curious about Morenci dogs for a long time. I receive the Observer at my home in Seattle, and spend a good deal of time puzzling over the crime report. “Thursday, 10 a.m. Loose dog complaint.” “Saturday, 9 p.m. Loose dog complaint. Placed in kennel.” “Tuesday,  9 p.m., barking dog complaint.”

At first I wondered what all these dogs were complaining about. And I wondered if these dogs were “loose” in the moral sense, or just running around unleashed and griping about something. That’s just the way I think. Most readers would assume the true interpretation of these reports: a dog complaint means people complaining about dogs. I know that now.

But isn’t that just as curious? Why so many dog problems in Morenci? Sometimes a  full one-third of the Observer’s police report items involve dogs. When I came back to Morenci for Thanksgiving, I knew it would be the perfect opportunity to investigate this myself. What was the real story behind the canine crime spree? To be honest, I thought the problem must be exaggerated.

I was wrong. Within two hours of my arrival here, the subject of a loose dog came up in a conversation with my  parents. There had been one in the back yard. On Thanksgiving day, my sister-in-law was taking a dog for a walk (on a leash) and got into an altercation with a loose dog. A different sister-in-law complained that she was afraid to go for a walk in certain parts of town because of some mean rottweilers. The next day I was at my brother’s house and happened to hear on his police radio a message about a dog being captured and taken to a kennel. It wasn’t a myth!

It seems to me there are three possible reasons for the preponderance of loose dogs. One possibility is that wild dogs who don’t belong to anyone are roaming the streets. They could be inter-breeding, living on garbage, and possibly evolving into a super-vicious Canis urbanis  species that will eventually terrorize and take over the town. This could lead to the end of the world as we know it.

Secondly, it could be that Morenci dogs are getting smarter than their owners. They are figuring out how to get over or under fences, how to slip out of their collars, and how to distract their owners long enough to make a sudden dash out an opened door. It happens to every dog owner once in a while, but here it could be happening all the time.

The last possibility is that some dog owners intentionally let their dogs out unattended. They open the gate and say, “Bye-bye,  Bowser, see you at dinner time.” Maybe these citizens think that their dog could never be a problem because Bowser is extraordinarily cute and well-behaved. Or maybe some citizens are the Michigan equivalent of hillbillies. “Git outta here, Bucky-dawg. Go catch yerself a rabbit!” 

It wouldn’t be right to simply complain about this without offering a solution. Here’s my idea. Any person who has his or her dog rounded up by the police more than once would be drafted to serve in the Loose Dog Patrol. The LDP could be called upon any time of the day or night to round up a wayward doggie. Meanwhile, the police could focus on safety and crime prevention. Morenci just needed an outsider like me to come in with a different perspective and a brilliant idea such as the LDP.

Meanwhile, the answer to Bob Dylan’s question at the start of this article is, “If dogs run free…” then we can’t, because we might get bitten—we might even get rabies.

    – Dec. 4, 2002 
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Front.sculpta
    SCULPTORS—Morenci third grade students Emersyn Thompson (left) and Marissa Lawrence turn spaghetti sticks into mini sculptures Friday during a class visit to Stair District Library. All Morenci Elementary School classes recently visited the library to experience the creative construction toys purchased through the “Sculptamania!” project, funded by a Disney Curiosity Creates grant. The grant is administered by the Association for Library Services to Children, a division of the American Library Association.
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • Shadow.salon
    LEARNING THE ROPES—Kristy Castillo (left), co-owner of Mane Street Salon, works with Kendal Kuhn as Sierra Orner takes a phone call. The two Morenci Area High School juniors spent Friday at the salon as part of a job shadowing experience.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.

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