2002.12.11 It's a dog's world here

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

DID YOU notice that it wasn’t me filling this space last week? I know many people did because they mentioned enjoying the dog tails, I mean tales, from my brother, Dan.

For years, Dan has provided commentary on Morenci’s police reports. If there’s mention of “Dog complaint,” he’ll ask what the dogs in Morenci are complaining about.

My chief goal for Dan’s Thanksgiving visit was to get him into the police notes. We could have inserted him on our own—we write the news, after all—but we were after the real thing. Dan was considering fleeing a police officer for his crime.

He wagged his tale and ran through the neighborhood on all fours. He parked on the wrong side of the street. He jaywalked repeatedly. He once spit on the sidewalk. He operated a steam-driven device after 10 p.m. All the usual things that will get a person onto the bottom of page three, but to no avail.

He left town with a clean record.

WE LIVE in a community of loose dogs and inoperable automobiles. Dan lives in a community of bizarre crimes involving guns and people with their pants down.

I’ve been on police report deprivation since the Alaska papers stopped arriving. The Observer was exchanged with a few papers from the far northwest for several years, but it finally ended.

Dan and his wife, Maggie, have helped fill my emptiness with a subscription to the Ballard News-Tribune. Ballard is a city in Washington that doesn’t really exist, and maybe that’s what makes it such a gold mine of interesting police news.

The News-Tribune has a correspondent who visits the police station every week to glean the finest items from the list. They probably have loose dogs in Ballard, too, but why write about that when there’s a man removing his clothes and walking around with his pants around his ankles?  Why mess with the theft of a bicycle when there’s a man dancing in the street in front of a fire engine? He was reported to have “glossy eyes.”

The headline on that brief report was a simple “Dancing man.” The pants-at-ankles story was called “Screaming man.” Here’s “Busy man”:

 A man living on Northwest 54th Street reported the theft of a .22-caliber pistol from his residence. He said he had placed it under his mattress approximately three years ago and that it is now missing. He wasn’t sure about suspects because, as he told officers, he’s had “numerous guests” during that time.

The outer Seattle neighborhoods are not without dog news. On SW Graham Street, a female thief knocked on a woman’s door and said she was searching for her lost Chihuahua. The home owner let the stranger in, as though the dog might be in her bedroom, I suppose, and then her purse was robbed.

A woman on 101st Street was awakened by her dog’s gentle growls. She went downstairs to find a stranger sleeping on her couch. A man on 101st Street NW was forcing a small pekingese-type dog to run alongside a pickup truck.

AS ALWAYS, I suppose we should be grateful that our police news is relatively bland. Loose dogs instead of tortured dogs. Perhaps a general lack of Chihuahuas, lost or otherwise.

But loose dogs are common, as Dan noted. In one of our final visits together before he left, I was eating lunch at home when what should catch our eye out the window? Of course, it was a loose dog, the same character I saw in the yard a day earlier.

He wrote his dog column before he learned that sister-in-law Ginny was walking along M-156 by the cemetery when she was joined by a loose dog. It wasn’t long before the dog was hit by a car and ran off injured across the field.

The driver stopped and gave her a look that said, “What do expect, lady, when you let your dog run loose on a busy road?”

Ginny agrees fully. What can you expect?

    – Dec. 11, 2002 
  • Front.nok Hok
    GAMES DAY—Finn Molitierno (right) celebrates a goal during a game of Nok Hockey with his sister, Kyla. The two tried out a variety of games Saturday at Stair District Library’s annual International Games Day event. One of the activities featured a sort of scavenger hunt in which participants had to locate facts presented in the Smithsonian Hometown Teams exhibit. The traveling show left Morenci’s library Tuesday, wrapping up a series of programs that began Oct. 2. Additional photos are on page 7.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.leaves
    MAPLE leaves show their fall colors in a puddle at Morenci’s Riverside Natural Area. “This was a great year for colors,” said local weather watcher George Isobar. Chilly mornings will give way to seasonable fall temperatures for the next two weeks.
  • Front.band
    MORENCI Marching Band member Brittany Dennis keeps the beat Friday during the half-time show of the Morenci/Pittsford football game. Color guard member Jordan Cordts is at the left. The band performed this season under the direction of Doyle Rodenbeck who served as Morenci’s band director in the 1970s. He’s serving as a substitute during a family leave.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Front.cowboy
    A PERFORMER named Biligbaatar, a member of the AnDa Union troupe from Inner Mongolia, dances at Stair District Library last week during a visit to the Midwest. The nine-member group blends a variety of traditions from Inner and Outer Mongolia. The music is described as drawing from “all the Mongol tribes that Genghis Khan unified.” The group considers itself music gatherers whose goal is to preserve traditional sounds of Mongolia. Biligbaatar grew up among traditional herders who live in yurts. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016