The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

2002.12.24 Julian Gunn leads me on

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Five story leads and interview prospects from Julian Gunn.  Every week, over and over, Julian Gunn sends me by e-mail five story leads. Sometimes I open the mail and take a glance. Sometimes I delete it unread.

Julian works for the Trafford Press in British Columbia. His company’s slogan is “book publishing for the rest of us.” This means that the hundreds of people—OK, the thousands of people—who have always wanted to publish a book can do it themselves with Trafford.

For as little as 499 U.S. dollars, anybody can fill a shelf or closet with books that no one wants to read. But at least you’ll have the satisfaction of having become a published author for the price of 20 cartons of quality cigarettes.

Believe me, I’m not faulting people for making this move. One of my favorite-authors-thinkers-wanderers-naturalists, Henry Thoreau, would have made a good customer for the Trafford Press. Henry died with most of his books still in his possession—unsold and largely ignored. jgunn2

So you never know. Maybe Welcome to Infinity: Exploring Ancient & Modern Techniques for Collaborating with Otherworldly Beings – A Personal Journey by Kathlyn Hinesley might someday become a classic. Or, after she dies, perhaps her children will simply toss that wacky book their mother wrote. You never know.

 I CHECKED out Julian Gunn at Trafford’s web site. It was good to see the face behind the dozens and dozens of press releases I’ve received over the years.

Apparently, Trafford is doing well, averaging about one new book every day. That keeps Julian busy.

Recently he wrote about Nu-Evermore by Peter Magliocco. Peter recently wrote a partly satirical sci-fi novel where the future remains elusive around a corner of curved space.

The author says the future is “threatening enough for us to take an ultrasound of things inside our terrestrial embryo plagued by wars and controversial scientific and medical discoveries….” It seems that Peter might be giving that book out for Christmas gifts for the next few years.

Julian wrote about Carlos Cortez’s Making Love with Our Eyes.  The author met Beverly, the love of his life, in 1986 and he says, “I am more in love with my beloved today than each day previous.” Something tells me I wouldn’t want to spend more than a few minutes with Carlos and Beverly.

One of Trafford’s newly published authors is Red Welch. His book, Don’t Let that Ignorant [fatherless child] Push You Around, received a pretty good review from a Doctor of Metaphysics, who most likely received a free review copy and will never have to shell out any money for the book.

Red Welch wrote his story years ago, but only recently approached Trafford. As Julian Gunn puts it, “He always knew there would come a time when the public would be ready for such a work.”

I’M BEGINNING to feel some sympathy for Julian Gunn. He has to read a new book every day and write something positive about it. Maybe he takes it all in stride. A challenge a day.

Maybe he actually enjoys it, but a few weeks ago he had to swim through Communicating with Orcas – the Whales’ Perspective. This is Mary J. Getten’s 229-page true story of telepathic communication with orcas to get “the inside story on their mysterious lives.”

Mary describes herself as a professional animal communicator. Time and space are no barrier, she says. From her home in the Pacific Northwest, she can talk with your beagle here in Morenci. She could even contact our dead dog, Sam, who disappeared in the early 1970s.

I’m tempted to fork over 40 bucks to hear Mary talk with Sam for 30 minutes, but I don’t know. I suppose I’m afraid to hear what he might have to say about me. There could be some bad blood there.

I’m not surprised to read that Julian Gunn is working on his own book. Someday he’ll write a press release for his own Trafford release that analyzes gender in science fiction. What do you think – is it destined to be a big seller? Hold on, I’m going to go ask my cat.

    – Dec. 24, 2002 

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