The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.skelton.vigil
    MORENCI’S three Skelton brothers were remembered with both tears and laughter last week during a candlelight vigil at Wakefield Park. Several people came out of the crowd to give their recollection of the boys who have now been missing for five years.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.

2006.12.06 Back from the third world

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Just like that, I became an instant fan of Miami, Florida.

This is from the guy who had visited Florida only once—more than 25 years earlier—and apparently found no great reason to return in the intervening years.

And don’t think it was just the warm weather that won me over. Even when I was still wearing three shirts to stay warm in “chilly” Miami, I was having a great time.

Look, on Thanksgiving morning when I walked from my son’s house down the block to the ocean, little lizards scurried across the sidewalk as I approached. I was sold on this city right then. That was good enough for me.

And to top it off, a few days later in a shopping center courtyard, I stood close to what looked like a small egret walking around the shrubbery eating those little lizards.

U.S. Rep. Tom Tancredo (R-Col.) recently called Miami a Third World city. He’s never visited the place, but he certainly doesn’t like what he hasn’t seen. To him, it’s a showcase of what could happen to America if we don’t get that wall built along the border with Mexico.

Tancredo, in his great wisdom, said that if you moved Miami to another place, you would never know you were in the U.S.A.

It seemed like somewhat of a foreign country to me, also, but not for Tancredo’s reasons.

 I’m thinking of trees and birds and...OK, Tancredo, even the people. We went to a dinner at the home of Morenci native David Carlson and there was a Cuban present, along with a Columbian and someone from French West Indies. David is married to a Puerto Rican/Polish Columbian via Brazil, or something like that.

This is a typical Miami crowd, but I think all of those people arrived through the airport. Tancredo’s wall wouldn’t have done a thing to prevent the wonderfully multicultural world of Miami.

On the morning after Thanksgiving, while the family wasted time in bed, I grabbed my GPS receiver and headed out on foot toward a geocache 1.6 miles away. Geocaching can take you to such interesting places.

I was headed for a park up the bay. The hider of the cache noted that Mr. Stallone and Mrs. Ritchie use to live down the street. That’s geocaching in Miami, he said.

I obviously received a slanted view of the city. Ben and his two housemates found a modest size house to rent in Coconut Grove, near his job, in a neighborhood of spectacular homes. Enormous structures in pastel colors with little balconies and decorative gates. A few featured large open areas with steel staircases, looking somewhat like private art museums.

The most interesting thing I learned about these monstrosities is what lies underneath. I saw a couple of them under construction and it’s nothing but cinder block. What we use for factories and grocery stores, the south Floridians turn into beautiful, stucco-covered mansions.

This was only one small part of Miami. I read in the newspaper about shanty towns elsewhere. I wasn’t seeing that, nor was I feeling the summer heat that’s so far out of Tancredo’s and my world.

The trees and shrubs were familiar but strange. Loud cousins of what we know in the north. Flowers are so much larger and showier, just like the houses.

A vine growing through trees looked like our common bindweed, but it had spectacular magenta flowers. One tree had leaves like the Kentucky coffeetree, another resembled redbud. Something else must have been a locust. And all the coconuts and palms? We weren’t in Michigan anymore.

The automobiles grow differently down there, too. Bentley. Lamborghini. Jaguar. Porsche. Aston Martin. Third-world Ben drives his grandparents’ old Ford Taurus—still in excellent condition, but...you understand.

The opulence really is out of the world that I know. How can there be so much wealth in this city?

But as I walked down Bayshore Drive toward the park, with dozens of joggers ignoring me completely, I noticed there were always vultures circling overhead.

It doesn’t really offer a comforting feeling about the city. Enjoy it while you can. With ocean levels expected to rise and the vultures waiting, all of this can’t last. Something has to give.

And me? I’m ready to go again.

    – Dec. 6, 2006

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016