The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

2012.07.04 A time to be born

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

I’m the grandfather of a two pound, two ounce boy. He’s quite a handful, and not much more. Two handfuls, max.

When Colleen came upstairs to wake me at 2:30 Saturday morning, I should have been overjoyed. I would have been under normal circumstances, but this was anything but normal.

I couldn’t muster much happiness. Dread, worry, fear—no problem with that. This just seemed like an impossible situation.

Our son Ben and his wife Sarah were expecting their first child in October. They were scheduled to make a visit home in a couple of weeks and we would all get a look at the expanding mother-to-be.

The uneasiness started Thursday morning when Ben called to tell us they were at the hospital because Sarah was having contractions—lots of them.

The hospital staff managed to slow the contractions during the day, and the hope was that baby would stay where he belonged for a few more weeks, if not months.

I was somewhat relieved by the end of the day. I heard there are some women who go through the contractions routine repeatedly on their way to a full term. Maybe Sarah was one of them.

And if she wasn’t, we kept hearing stories that seem truly miraculous—the miracle of modern medicine, that is. Several people had stories about early arrivals who made it through just fine.

After a day and a half, Sarah’s contractions had slowed to one every half hour. Things seemed to be stabilizing. She had been moved to Miami’s top neonatal hospital just in case, but sleep came easier that night—at least for a few hours. Ben called to say his son had arrived and the preemie adventure was underway.

I was thinking back to Ben’s arrival 30 years earlier. He was much more stubborn about getting out. It finally took an active walk along Bean Creek—stepping over fallen trees in the “Old Bean” channel—that seemed to set things in motion.

Of course I can remember the first glimpse of him when he was fresh to the world and I wonder how it was for Ben when his tiny boy arrived. There must have been that same rush of excitement and wonder that every new father feels, and I hope those feelings transcended the worry.

For me, the situation hasn’t improved much. I dread hearing the phone ring. I can feel something tighten inside me every time a new text message arrives on my wife’s cell phone. Her steps on the stairs—is she finally coming to bed or does she have bad news to report?

I can’t help it. It just seems like such a precarious situation that Ryland Emmery Green has found himself in. And poor Sarah—a new mother who can’t even touch her baby.

I drove Colleen to the airport Saturday for her flight to Miami. I shouldn’t have done it on Town and Country Festival weekend, but I just welcomed the chance to get out of town and put my mind on something else, like driving.

Of course there was an occasional text message arriving to give me something to cringe about. After all, the messages haven’t been too cheery. After the initial “baby is born and breathing on its own” came a report about respiratory distress and intubation underway. But that’s generally the case in these situations.

I told Colleen I would be glad to have her phone out of the house so I wouldn’t hear the messages arriving. She thought that was odd. “I always think every text is going to be good news,” she said.

Are you kidding? Look at this one that Ben sent tonight: “The feeding tube through umbilical cord isn’t working so they are trying a different method tonight. I guess it’s not uncommon.”

I’m trying really hard to be happy without the worry, but these problems—common and uncommon—put me on edge.

Take some pity on your grandpa, boy. Grow strong. Stay healthy. Show us another ounce or two. Give us a little improvement every day. Come on, you’ve got a lot of growing ahead of you.

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