2011.09.08 Houses by million$

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

We all get our share of uninvited e-mail, but I’m sure that some businesses attract more than others. Newspapers probably end up with a more interesting variety than most businesses.

For example, you probably didn’t know there was to be a single lane closure on southbound US-23 from just south of the I-96 interchange to Lee Road last weekend.

Were you aware that Endtime Ministries classifies the rise of facial recognition technology under its Mark of the Beast category?

Did you know that as of Aug. 29, the average price of gasoline in Michigan rose 7.3¢ a gallon to $3.76? Hmmm, must be a holiday approaching.

I’ll bet you didn’t know that Mike Busley, founder of Grand Traverse Pie Co., was appointed to the Michigan Travel Commission, and that Geary Bates of Wintersville, Ohio, was named to Ohio’s Amusement Ride Safety Advisory Board.

This is a very small sampling. I would be one of the most informed members of my community if I did more than hit “delete” several dozen times a day—day after day after day.

There’s one junk e-mail that gets my attention now and then. The company does a good job with its heading to avoid the delete.

 “Big Hooters Auction.” “Dead Vampires, John McCain and Donald Trump.” “An Arkansas Castle and Burt’s Foreclosure.”

A few months ago I started receiving the weekly update from Top Ten Real Estate Deals, and I have to admit, it’s a pretty good waste of time.

Take the one that mentions McCain and Trump, for example. On the website you see “John McCain Home Foreclosure.” The details show that it’s the home where he and Cindy raised their family.

A new owner bought the place for $3.2 million and spent another $1.3 million for renovations (11 bedrooms and 13 bathrooms now). It went up for auction last month for only $3 million.

The story ends with this: “Sarah P., couldn’t you have had a little patience? Kicking yourself now?”

That’s in reference to Sarah Palin who was featured in June after she spent $1.7 million on an Arizona mansion. Remember, she’s just “one of us.”

That same issue mentioned Glenn Beck taking a 27 percent loss on his New York mansion originally priced at $6.5 million. All of this pales in light of the sale of Ellen Degeneres’ house valued at $49 million.

For that kind of money, you could buy a 31,000 square foot beach house in Hillsboro, Fla., with 232 feet of beach frontage. The link to the realty company’s website shows quite an array of multi-million dollar properties—dozens and dozens at reduced prices.

Most of the reductions are on the low side—$200,000 off here, $100,000 there—but there’s a “waterfront gem” in Fort Lauderdale that’s going for a million off, now down to $5.9.

An elegant 9,900 square foot villa in Boca Raton is selling for $7.45 million, but what would you expect for dockage that can handle three yachts? The owners are taking a loss on this one: the price has been slashed by $2.45 million.

It makes you curious about the sellers. What do they do in life to earn that kind of money? What’s their life like now when they’re taking that kind of loss?

Back to the Top Ten. What about the Big Hooters Auction? It’s the property and equipment from the Hooters restaurant in Beckley, W. Va., valued at $2.5 million.

There’s more from West Virginia. You can bid on the property where abolitionist John Brown was hung. The 7,000 square foot home is valued at $2.25 million, but you know how housing values stand. The suggested starting bid is listed at $950,000. I wouldn’t be surprised if Brown was allowed to use the original outhouse still standing, but he never got near the water slide in the pool.

Everything mentioned so far falls short of the “world’s most expensive ranch,” a three-bedroom home near Jackson Hole, Wyo., selling for $175 million. That includes land for 35 home sites.

I keep thinking about the enormous places you see from time to time. What makes some people want to build huge, showy houses while others are satisfied with something so much smaller?

If it doesn’t work out with the big one, Top Ten offers an article titled “Life after bankruptcy.”

  • Front.splash
    Water Fun—Carter Seitz and Colson Walter take a fast trip along a plastic sliding strip while water from a sprinkler provides the lubrication. The boys took a break from tie-dyeing last week at Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program to cool off in the water.
  • Front.starting
    BIKE-A-THON—Children in Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program brought their bikes last Tuesday to participate in a bike-a-thon. Riders await the start of the event at the elementary school before being led on a course through town by organizer Leonie Leahy.
  • Front.drum
    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
  • Front.art.park
    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks

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