2011.09.08 Houses by million$

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

We all get our share of uninvited e-mail, but I’m sure that some businesses attract more than others. Newspapers probably end up with a more interesting variety than most businesses.

For example, you probably didn’t know there was to be a single lane closure on southbound US-23 from just south of the I-96 interchange to Lee Road last weekend.

Were you aware that Endtime Ministries classifies the rise of facial recognition technology under its Mark of the Beast category?

Did you know that as of Aug. 29, the average price of gasoline in Michigan rose 7.3¢ a gallon to $3.76? Hmmm, must be a holiday approaching.

I’ll bet you didn’t know that Mike Busley, founder of Grand Traverse Pie Co., was appointed to the Michigan Travel Commission, and that Geary Bates of Wintersville, Ohio, was named to Ohio’s Amusement Ride Safety Advisory Board.

This is a very small sampling. I would be one of the most informed members of my community if I did more than hit “delete” several dozen times a day—day after day after day.

There’s one junk e-mail that gets my attention now and then. The company does a good job with its heading to avoid the delete.

 “Big Hooters Auction.” “Dead Vampires, John McCain and Donald Trump.” “An Arkansas Castle and Burt’s Foreclosure.”

A few months ago I started receiving the weekly update from Top Ten Real Estate Deals, and I have to admit, it’s a pretty good waste of time.

Take the one that mentions McCain and Trump, for example. On the website you see “John McCain Home Foreclosure.” The details show that it’s the home where he and Cindy raised their family.

A new owner bought the place for $3.2 million and spent another $1.3 million for renovations (11 bedrooms and 13 bathrooms now). It went up for auction last month for only $3 million.

The story ends with this: “Sarah P., couldn’t you have had a little patience? Kicking yourself now?”

That’s in reference to Sarah Palin who was featured in June after she spent $1.7 million on an Arizona mansion. Remember, she’s just “one of us.”

That same issue mentioned Glenn Beck taking a 27 percent loss on his New York mansion originally priced at $6.5 million. All of this pales in light of the sale of Ellen Degeneres’ house valued at $49 million.

For that kind of money, you could buy a 31,000 square foot beach house in Hillsboro, Fla., with 232 feet of beach frontage. The link to the realty company’s website shows quite an array of multi-million dollar properties—dozens and dozens at reduced prices.

Most of the reductions are on the low side—$200,000 off here, $100,000 there—but there’s a “waterfront gem” in Fort Lauderdale that’s going for a million off, now down to $5.9.

An elegant 9,900 square foot villa in Boca Raton is selling for $7.45 million, but what would you expect for dockage that can handle three yachts? The owners are taking a loss on this one: the price has been slashed by $2.45 million.

It makes you curious about the sellers. What do they do in life to earn that kind of money? What’s their life like now when they’re taking that kind of loss?

Back to the Top Ten. What about the Big Hooters Auction? It’s the property and equipment from the Hooters restaurant in Beckley, W. Va., valued at $2.5 million.

There’s more from West Virginia. You can bid on the property where abolitionist John Brown was hung. The 7,000 square foot home is valued at $2.25 million, but you know how housing values stand. The suggested starting bid is listed at $950,000. I wouldn’t be surprised if Brown was allowed to use the original outhouse still standing, but he never got near the water slide in the pool.

Everything mentioned so far falls short of the “world’s most expensive ranch,” a three-bedroom home near Jackson Hole, Wyo., selling for $175 million. That includes land for 35 home sites.

I keep thinking about the enormous places you see from time to time. What makes some people want to build huge, showy houses while others are satisfied with something so much smaller?

If it doesn’t work out with the big one, Top Ten offers an article titled “Life after bankruptcy.”

  • Cecil
    THE MAYOR—Cecil Schoonover poses with a collection of garden gnomes that mysteriously arrive and disappear from his property. Along with the gnomes, someone created the sign stating that he is the Mayor of Gnomesville. He hasn’t yet tracked down the people involved in the prank, but he’s having a good time with the mystery.
  • Front.rest
    TAKE A BREAK—Last Wednesday’s session of Stair District Library’s Summer Reading Program ended with a quiet period in a class presented by yoga instructor Melany Gladieux of Toledo. Children learned a variety of yoga poses in the main room at the library, then finished off the session relaxing. Additional photos are on page 7. Area children are invited to visit the library today when the Michigan Science Center presents a flight program at 11 a.m. and roller coasters at 1 p.m.
  • Front.batter
    THE DERBY—Tyler “Smallpox” Flakne of Minnesota’s Home Run League All-Stars goes for the fence Friday night during the National Wiffle League Association’s home run derby in Morenci. This year the wiffleball national tournament moved from Dublin, Ohio, to Morenci’s Wakefield Park. During the derby, competitors had two minutes to hit as many home runs as possible. The winner this year finished with 21. See page 6 and 7 for additional photos.
  • Front.green Screen
    OUT OF THIS WORLD—Elizabeth McFadden and Elise Christle pose in front of the green screen as VolunTeen Noah Gilson makes them appear as though they are standing on the Moon. More photos from the Stair District Library’s NASA @ My Library program are on page 12.
  • Front.snake
    Lannis Smith of the Leslie Science and Nature Center in Ann Arbor shows off a python last week at Stair District Library's Summer Reading Program.
  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
  • Pipeline Spread
    LINED UP—Lengths of pipe were put in place last week along the route of the Rover natural gas pipeline that will stretch from Defiance, Ohio, to Ontario, Canada. Topsoil was removed before the pipes were laid out. The 42-inch diameter pipeline is scheduled for completion in November.
  • Front.rock Study
    ROCKHOUNDS—From the left, Joseph McCullough, Sean Pagett and Jonathan McCullough peer through hand lenses to study rocks. The project is part of Morenci Elementary School’s summer camp that continues into August.

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