2011.07.20 I'm still on my feet

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

EVERYTHING is pointing to feet these days. Mine and others.

Colleen walked in Friday night from work and asked, “Who do those sandals belong to?”

It was a pair of flip-flops that she spotted just inside the front door. There are tiny moose on the straps.

They aren’t mine and they looked like a woman’s sandal to me. Maddie is in Wyoming working at the geology camp where she was a student a couple of summers ago. This time she’s washing the dishes dirtied by students—with Teton National Forest all around for her spare time. Someone has to do it.

Rosanna is in Toronto doing one of her every-other-weekend visits with her husband who will soon complete a graduate school project.

It wasn’t long before Colleen had moved to the bathroom asking who the bath towel on the floor belonged to. No, not that one. This one here. She didn’t recall it being there when she left for work in the morning.

I’d only been home from work for a half hour or so. Did she think perhaps I had a secret tryst that wasn’t well covered up? Or was there a Goldilocks sort of person in our house?

I went into the kitchen looking for a bowl of oatmeal. I thought of heading upstairs to find out which bed she settled into, but instead I just ignored it and attributed the entire incident to the excessive fatigue of a library director during library renovation. In other words, she’s nuts.

SEVERAL people have entered the office recently and discovered me standing behind my desk. “Back problems?” they ask.

Several weeks have passed since I wrote about trying out a standing desk at work. I’d read that sitting all day in a chair isn’t as good for a body as standing or at least moving around a lot. I had the strongest urge to give it a try and I’ve been on my feet ever since.

I wasn’t about to spend hundreds of dollars for a real standing desk. Mine is very homemade and in need of improvement.

My computer monitor is placed on top of two envelope boxes plus one county telephone book and a package of Royal Fiber paper. My keyboard rests on two other envelope boxes. I’m using envelopes that the school ordered back in the 1990s. They stopped ordering them before my stock was depleted. I have matching letterhead somewhere.

The computer mouse continues to be the problem. At first it was on my desk, which was at least two envelope boxes too low. I found the perfect solution for a while. I turned the lower envelope box perpendicular to the top one and created a small surface one box down.

The standing part has gone just fine. My feet don’t hurt but my right hand started to ache and it’s still not back to normal. The angle of my hand on the mouse at one box high caused internal problems. Now the mouse is up on top sharing limited space with the keyboard. It falls off and bangs the desk about once a day and that tends to frighten Kim across the room.

The easy solution would probably be two more envelope boxes to the right of the existing ones. I hesitate to do this. It looks weird enough as it is.

For me, the standing desk adventure is a great success. I don’t intend to sit down again, at least not all the time. In the previous column I mentioned learning that movement is the key. You don’t want to just stand there all day. 

I have a bar stool type of chair that I sometimes lean against and sometimes sit on. I favor one foot and then the other. Movement.

For me, it’s a success; for one guy, it’s the oddest thing he’s ever seen. Jacob Clark just shakes his head every time he walks in and sees me standing. Standing when there’s a chair? It just doesn’t make sense.

THIS was to be a foot column, but I’m running short of space. No room for details on how Colleen has started to push me when I’m off balance. No space to mention our desire to learn how to sashay like on the introduction to the excellent post-Katrina television show “Treme.”

But I will squeeze this in: I contacted my daughters. The flip-flops belong to Rosie. They’ve been there for weeks.

  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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