The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Snow.2
    FIRST SNOW—Heavy, wet flakes piled deep on tree branches—and windshields—as the area received its first significant snowfall of the season. “Usually it begins with a dusting or two,” said George Isobar, Morenci’s observer for the National Weather Service, “but this time it came with a vengeance.” By the end of the day Saturday, a little over four inches of snow was on the ground. Now comes the thaw with temperatures in the 40s and 50s for three days.
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    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
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    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
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    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.homecoming Court
    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.
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2010.12.08 Getting by in our tiny outpost

Written by David Green.


How are we all doing in our tiny rural outpost?

It’s true, Morenci is no longer a sleepy little town. The Detroit News has characterized us as a “tiny rural outpost.” I’m really glad they did that because it actually caused me to laugh out loud.

Merriam-Webster defines outpost as “an outlying or frontier settlement.” I suppose that’s how we appear to the Detroit media folks. They’re driving through miles and miles of nothing but empty, brown farmland wondering, “How do people live like this?”

Finally, they see a sign for Morenci and they soon reach the tiny frontier settlement.

We’ve been a sleepy little town for so many years of daily newspaper clichéd coverage. I really welcome the change, but don’t they know that people aren’t sleeping well? We really are tired these days. Have you seen police chief Larry Weeks lately?

Many, many people have spoken about how proud and impressed they’ve been with regard to Larry as he faces the TV cameras and reporters. The number of cameras increased through the week and I think at the maximum there were nine large video cameras staring him in the face.

There was also me with my little Flip camera, rudely recording the reporters and video people. That’s what was really interesting for us outposters. We know what Larry looks like, but golly gee, we’ve never seen these big city types before. I still recall the look that Reporter A gave when Reporter B’s louder voice overruled hers and he got to ask the question. Perhaps you watched these news conference videos on the Observer website.

One thing that really impressed me about Larry is that he answered each question without slapping his forehead or saying, “You’ve got to be kidding. You’re asking me that?”

It was either Day 5 or 6 of the investigation when a TV reporter asked if John Skelton’s computer had been searched for clues.

Now if it had been me or you, we would have given a startled look, slapped our forehead and said, “Oh my gosh, we never thought of that. Thank you, thank you.” But Chief Weeks politely gave an answer with no sign of disbelief.

I was also impressed that at two different news conferences, he said something about “leaving no stone unturned.” Had it been me, it would have come out “no tern unstoned.” I know I would have blown it.

If you haven’t yet been interviewed by a TV reporter, I hope you don’t feel slighted. Probably 10 percent of us frontierspeople have stood in front of one, however, I’m not among them.

I declined an offer from Detroit Mike last Tuesday night when I was addressing newspapers. He tracked me down as the guy in the neighborhood with the blog.

“It will only take five minutes,” he said. “Three minutes? You can keep on working.”

I should have convinced him to bundle newspapers. He could have taken the Detroit bag back home with him and maybe those subscribers would have received their paper the same week it was published for a change.

I had a call Friday from someone at Channel 4 in Detroit wanting to get some information that I wasn’t yet aware of.

“You know how it goes,” I told her. “They don’t tell you about an event and then they criticize you for not covering it.”

She knew just what I meant. She kindly asked if there was anything they could help me with. I suggested covering the girls game at Hudson for me that night.

I should have asked for help with proofreading. The Observer is known for keeping its typos to a minimum, but corrections to last week’s lead story weren’t made. On a sports page we learned this about Fayette’s boys team: “Faystarts sea-son Sat. at Lirty Center.” And of course there was that page 3 story about Santa arriving in Fatyette.

Let’s just say that things were busy last week at deadline.

I wish I didn’t have to write a single word more about this incident—well, I’d gladly go with “Boys return home from Disneyland trip”—but it’s certainly not over, not for us and not for the big media.

As I left the police station Saturday, I heard the woman at the phone saying back to the caller, “You say you listened to the Nancy Grace show...?”

Another slap to the forehead.

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