2010.05.26 Springing into danger

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

I always wanted a chunk of uranium when I was a kid. And better yet, I wanted a Geiger counter so I could find my own uranium and get rich.

This urge was probably an offshoot from my mineralogy kit. It was a wonderful thing to have spread across the dinner table.spring_shoes.jpg

The kit was housed in a metal container that unfolded into three panels. One third contained various rock samples. The other sections had acids for testing and tools for scratching and rubbing, plus a bunsen burner. All the stuff a kid needed to learn about rocks.

Or so I thought. I don’t think I ever could identify anything I found except limestone, but I didn’t need a mineralogy kit for that. Just a little vinegar would do. Vinegar was probably one of the acids in my kit.

When I drove to the track meet Saturday in Hillsdale, I listened to the radio show “Wait, Wait, Don’t Tell Me,” and heard mention of the 10 Most Dangerous Toys.

Number two on the list of the all-time dangerous—just after Jarts lawn darts with 6,700 reported injuries and four deaths—came the Gilbert U-238 Atomic Energy Lab.

This could have been a happy Christmas for me; it came with a Geiger counter and four uranium-bearing ore samples plus three other low-level radiation sources.

An electroscope, a spinthariscope, a Wilson cloud chamber—pretty elaborate for fifty bucks and a great way to foster a new generation of contaminated scientists. There was even a comic book called “Learn How Dagwood Split the Atom.”

It’s time on the toy shelf was quite brief, however, and not available by the time I had an interest. Ah, those simpler, fool-hardy days of the 1950s.

Number six on the list also comes from the 1950s—the Bat Masterson Derringer Belt Gun. I remember this item. I don’t think I owned one, but I’m sure there was one in the neighborhood. Bob Ackland? The Bryner boys? John Bancroft?

There was a little cap gun built into the belt buckle. All a kid had to do was puff out his stomach and a little gun would pop out and fire off a cap. Supposedly there was a problem with flesh burns, although I don’t recall any incidents.

You might remember these words: “Every boy wants a Remco toy...and so do girls.” The company made an impressive array of toys that boys wanted, including the 1961 item called the Johnny Reb Cannon. This one made the Most Dangerous list.

It fired hard, plastic cannonballs with a spring mechanism and has been described this way: “Any aspiring secessionist need only pull a lanyard.” I suppose there were some ophthalmological issues.

I’m surprised by the absence of Satellite Jumping Shoes. They’re certainly a candidate for the dangers list. I had a pair when we lived on East Street South, which means I must have been five years old. I suppose they came from Art Ellison’s Western Auto store.

These were metal red shoes mounted on enormous springs. They had leather straps and an adjustable length slider that was held in place with a thumbscrew.

Put ’em on, strap yourself in and take a leap. There was no way to know which direction the rebounding spring would take you. Into the wall, down the porch steps, always against the sidewalk. There was no control, at least not for a clumsy five-year-old.

I liked the things. I liked the idea of bouncing around on the moon. But try as I might, I could never master the shoes for more than a couple bounces before I shot off onto the grass, if I was lucky.

I suppose somewhere there were kids who could bounce right down the block with ease, but I’m guessing the other 99 percent required frequent bandaging.

On eBay, where everything is available, it’s possible to buy a new pair, unused, still in the original box. From my recollection, I think that might be the best place for the Satellite Rocket Shoes.

  • Front.little Ball
    Fayette's Demetrious Whiteside (left)Skylar Lester attempt to keep the ball from going out of bounds during Morenci's recent basketball tournament for fourth and fifth grade teams. Morenci's Andrew Schmidt stands by.
  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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