The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.skelton.vigil
    MORENCI’S three Skelton brothers were remembered with both tears and laughter last week during a candlelight vigil at Wakefield Park. Several people came out of the crowd to give their recollection of the boys who have now been missing for five years.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.

2010.04.21 Maybe we don't want to know

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

There are some things you just don’t tell your parents. They don’t have to know. I thought of that recently when I asked Maddie about the waves in Bali.

Overseas study. It still amazes me that so many college kids travel across the big water to pick up a few credits—a few very interesting credits.

I certainly don’t fault kids who can pull it off. Maddie puts in a lot of hours in a job she has while going to school, and she has the smarts to get something I never saw—scholarships.

Besides, when I went to school, I don’t recall anyone signing up for overseas study. It was a real rarity. I went camping at Pinery Provincial Park once, across the big water of the Detroit River and north to Lake Huron.

That wasn’t nearly as foreign as a spring break trip to Florida. I didn’t receive any academic credit for either trip, although I learned a little about county sheriff deputies of the south. I probably never told my parents.

After Maddie’s six-week class in Thailand and Malaysia concluded, she did some cheap traveling around Southeast Asia. While in Bali, she satisfied a long-held desire to go surfing. The opportunities in Michigan are rather slim, but she signed up for a surfing class and had a blast.

I asked her later if the waves were very large. She said they were and added, “We went to a beach one day and I thought I was never gonna come up a couple times.”

There it is; that’s the sort of story you don’t tell your parents.

Actually, I was glad to hear it. I’m very pleased she’s having these experiences—and even more pleased to know she’s surviving them.

The class involved a lot of snorkeling in the reefs (the toughest 12 credits she’s ever earned, I’m sure), but she told us something early on that left us a little unsettled.

The kids were warned by their instructor to avoid touching a tiny water snake they might encounter while snorkeling. It didn’t have a very powerful jaw and could only pierce the skin between the fingers. However, a bite generally led to death. There wasn’t much that could be done.

When she told that story, I immediately wondered if this was the Thai version of the Snipe Hunt. There was just something about it that didn’t sound quite right.

I asked Mr. Google about the matter and learned there are some nasty snakes in Thailand (such as the ngoo tap saming kla and ngoo chong ahng), but nothing came close to describing the illusive little water snake.

Still, it gave the parents something to think about for a few weeks.

I told my parents about my encounter with a mother black bear and how her jaws grabbed my thigh through the tent, but I related that story long after it happened. Actually, I think they rather enjoyed the tale.

That’s the only really frightening thing I can remember, other than helping to start a car somewhere in Washington state.

I was hitching across the country and got picked up by a nurse from Colorado somewhere in British Columbia. Heading south, we’d stopped somewhere along the coastal road and her car wouldn’t start after the rest stop.

There was a downward slope to the road, so I pushed her car back out of the parking spot, and then started pushing it down the road.

The car fired up and the nurse and her dog headed down the road with my backpack and other possessions in the back seat. Would I ever see them again?

Yes, she turned around and came back to get me. I don’t think I ever told my parents that story.

Maddie told us one day about a hike that a few of the kids took with a professor. Most of the class was water oriented, so for something different they headed inland up into the mountains.

It was supposed to be a five-hour excursion at the most, but something went wrong. It turned into a nine-hour adventure with paths hacked by machete,  students helping each other down steep hills, grabbing onto ant-covered, thorny vines, crawling through rocks and avoiding falls. They had an OK time.

We know about jumping out of the taxi in Jakarta, about the frightening hotel in Vietnam and the motorbike tour in Vietnam, but I can’t help but wonder what she’s holding back. Maybe the details will leak out over the years.

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