The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.cheers
    MACEE BEERS joins other Fayette Elementary School students for the annual Mini-Cheer performance during the half-time break at the basketball game.
  • Family.3.wide
    CHILDREN at Stair District Library’s Family Story Time toss scarves into the air during an activity. The evening program provided a mix of stories, songs, dancing, crafts and snacks Monday evening. The program is offered at 5:30 p.m. every Monday for five more weeks. The program is designed for three to five year olds and their family.
  • Front.newpaper.2
    THE INTERVIEW—Evelyn Joughin (right) records the interaction with an iPad while Jack Varga, next to her, asks questions of Morenci Elementary School principal Gail Frey. Morenci senior Sam Cool (standing) listens. Cool serves as the editor for the newspaper written by members of Mrs. Barrett’s second grade class.
  • Front.code.2
    WRITING CODE—Brock Christle (left), a Morenci fifth grade student, takes a look at the progress being made by fourth grader Anthony Lewis. Libby Rorick, a sixth grade student, is next in a line of girls trying out the coding tutorials. This year marked Morenci’s second year of participation in the Hour of Code project.
  • Front.gym.new
    REMIE RYAN (left) tries to dodge the foam wand held by Hayden Bays during physical education class at Morenci Elementary School. In the background, Lauryn Dominique and Brooklyn Williams stay clear of the tag. Second grade students were working on cardiovascular health on the first day back from vacation. For the record, Safety Tag is a very difficult sport to photograph.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.library.books
    MACK DICKSON takes a book off the “blind date” cart at the Fayette library. Patrons can choose a book without knowing what’s inside other than a general category. The books are among those designated for removal so patrons can consider them gifts. In Morenci, new books and staff favorites were chosen from the stacks and must be returned. Patrons get a piece of chocolate, too, to take on their date, but no clue about their “date.” One reader said she really enjoyed her book for a few pages, but then lost interest—so typical for a blind date.

2010.02.17 Once a runner, never a runner

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

I visited with a friend from high school recently whom I had seen maybe only once or twice since we occasionally bumped into one another at college.

He asked if I was still running.

Still running, I thought to myself. That implies that I was once a runner. I was never a runner. Not really. I could recall wanting to be a runner and trying to be a runner, but I never liked it all that much.

I don’t recall how I answered his question other than saying that I wasn’t running, but it did get me to thinking about my life as a runner.

I suppose it began on Cawley Road when Susan Webster’s dog, Pepper, would chase us around her house. I was terrified of that little dog. I’m guessing that if a person would have suddenly turned and yelled and Pepper would have skedaddled in the other direction, but I never thought of that at age six.

On a safe run, I would leave Susan’s front porch and make it all the way around to the back without spotting the little Devil Dog. Most times he would be encountered halfway around. I would suddenly reverse course, with those little teeth gaining on me all the way up the steps and onto the low brick wall.

In my junior year of high school I went out for track and became a half miler. That was in the days of Mr. Ritsema, who trained us by making us hold onto a T-bar attached to the rear of his car.

I won my race occasionally. I think I placed third at the league meet or maybe it was the county meet. Was I that good? Probably not. I got in the slow heat at the regional competition and missed a trip to the state meet by a second or so.

That was the closest I became to becoming a runner. I’ve been in the slow heat ever since.

Before leaving for college I bought a pair of Puma running shoes. They were the latest thing. The Bryner boys were with me when I made the purchase—I must have gotten a ride to the big city with them for shopping—and Jim thought it was rather ridiculous. He already had a year in college and knew those things were not needed. [Note of interest: Everybody, I mean everybody, wears “running shoes” now. Very few of us did in 1968.]

I don’t remember ever running in college except in the required gym class.

I was soon to enter my bicycling era (sort of running on wheels), but when I moved downtown in Portland, Ore., I bought another pair of running shoes. I even went out running in them half a dozen times, perhaps.

When I returned to Morenci, I might have run along the creek path a few times. Maybe I was just frantically searching for Ben who was overdue from a hike.

My wife and I try to be walkers now, and sometimes we run a 100-yard stretch of the 400 yard loop. (No, we haven’t completed our metric conversion).

I was on a massage therapist’s table recently (man, she really knows how to hurt a guy) and she asked about my exercise. I told her I walk and I run up and down the stairs.

I explained the latter activity was intentional. I really run up and down the stairs. It’s great exercise. I don’t know if I would really classify it as running. It’s just repeatedly climbing and unclimbing stairs.

She was asking because of the word “run.” Very hard on the body, she said. Maybe she was sizing me up for return visits because she does a lot of work smoothing out the bodies of runners.

I don’t know if she meant it this way, but I took her words as sage advice: Running is hard on the body.

I put her words to practice immediately. I still won’t become a runner.

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