The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Snow.2
    FIRST SNOW—Heavy, wet flakes piled deep on tree branches—and windshields—as the area received its first significant snowfall of the season. “Usually it begins with a dusting or two,” said George Isobar, Morenci’s observer for the National Weather Service, “but this time it came with a vengeance.” By the end of the day Saturday, a little over four inches of snow was on the ground. Now comes the thaw with temperatures in the 40s and 50s for three days.
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    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
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    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
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    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.homecoming Court
    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.
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2006.08.16 Fathoming the female brain

Written by David Green.


I suppose I’m just too dense to really understand it. My brain doesn’t work that way.

I’m talking about the differences in the male and the female brain. Very stark differences. Totally different approaches to life.

Neuropsychiatrist Louann Brizendine says that the sooner men and women accept and appreciate the neurological differences, the better we’ll all get along. No kidding. Reading through her findings makes you wonder how most couples have managed to stay together as long as they have.

Despite the gains that women have made over the past 50 years, Brizendine says, the human brain is still wired for basic necessities, as in Stone Age needs. The male and female brains are built a little differently, the chemical composition is not the same. It’s there from the start; boy and girl babies come packaged differently.

“Their brains are different by the time they’re born and their brains are what drive their impulses, values and their very reality,” Brizendine says.

As she puts it, women have an eight-lane highway for processing emotion while men have a small country road. To translate this into practical experience—

She: What’s wrong?

He: Nothing.

Or maybe something like—

She: How can you not see that I’m upset?

He: You don’t seem any different to me.

It’s not that men’s brains are incapable of heavy-duty thinking. Back to Brizendine. Men’s brains are like O’Hare Airport as a hub for processing thoughts about sex. For women, it’s more like that little grass-covered runway that used to be out on the west side of town.

Brizendine isn’t a man-basher—instead she celebrates the differences in the sexes—although some people might take her wrong when she says something like this: “The typical male brain reaction to an emotion is to avoid it at all costs.”

I take no offense. It reminds me of one of my all-time favorite cartoons that I clipped from a magazine.

She: (looking exasperated)

He: Couldn’t we talk about this after we’re dead?

Here’s a sampling of Brizendine’s findings:

• Thoughts about sex enter women’s brains once every couple of days; for men, thoughts about sex occur every minute.

• Women use about 20,000 words a day; men use 7,000.

• Women remember fights that a man insists never happened.

• Women over 50 are more likely to initiate divorce.

• Women excel at knowing what people are feeling; men have difficulty spotting an emotion unless someone cries or threatens bodily harm.

Bodily harm? Listen to this tale of oxytocin, one of those brain chemicals that affect women.

Brizendine has done a lot of research on her own, but she examined more than a thousand studies from various fields to write her book, “The Female Brain.” From all of this she explains so many behaviors, such as why teenage girls love to talk on the phone or—to be more up to date—swap text messages.

“Connecting through talking activates the pleasure centers in a girl’s brain,” Brizendine writes. “We’re not talking about a small amount of pleasure. This is huge.”

Rushes of dopamine and oxytocin through the brain.

And speaking of oxytocin, Brizendine says that the female brain naturally releases the substance after a 20-second hug. The embrace bonds the huggers and triggers the brain’s trust circuits. She advises women that they shouldn’t allow a guy to hug them unless they trust him. And if they trust him, make sure it lasts 20 seconds.

I tried to explain that concept to my wife yesterday. After about 20 seconds, she said, “And now what, a fist comes rising up?” as she lifted hers, expecting that self-defense was in order.

I think a little more research is needed. Brizendine never wrote anything about the female fist.

   – Aug. 16, 2006

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