The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2010.01.06 It's back to the back

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

OK, so we’ve gone through the finger splits and the leg cramps. I mentioned the mysterious smell of cigarette smoke when there’s no one around smoking, and, as expected, I received no response on that oddity.

We might as well keep this health thing going. This week: the back. The lower back, to be exact.

Here’s my story. On the Sunday before Christmas, I was wrapping a gift for my wife when I reached across the box and felt it go. Something on the right side of my lower back.

I do this every year or two or three. Sometimes it’s the upper back, sometimes the neck, and this time the lower back. It never happens from lifting something heavy or straining. Instead, it’s a simple act such as lifting a cereal bowl or drying my hair after showering.

This time it was an act of gift-giving, and it was a doozy. I could tell immediately that it wasn’t going to go away. It was Sunday, with the two newspaper days coming up. 

I wore one of those elastic truss things around my waist and walked slowly around the office Monday and Tuesday. Wednesday morning we left for a family Christmas party in East Lansing, then later in the day we drove on north to deliver son, Ben, and his wife, Sarah, to her parents’ house.

Colleen had received an e-mail notice about great deals at Grand Traverse Resort near Traverse City and she signed us up for a couple of nights.

Five hours in the car didn’t do anything good for my back. By then the pain had moved on across to the other side, also. I was a mess.

On Thursday afternoon—Christmas Eve day—I started looking for chiropractors in the area. I wrote down some addresses and headed out in the car. 

I passed one of the offices and it had deep snow in the driveway. I thought I was just having phone problems when a recording told me the number was no longer in service. Two other places were closed and another I couldn’t find. Only one remaining.

I parked in front, walked in and asked if they were still taking appointments. The receptionist asked if I had an appointment. I told them my predicament and the doctor said to come on in. The receptionist didn’t seem too pleased. She was about to walk out the door.

I hurried through some paperwork and asked if they would accept a credit card. The receptionist said, “No;” the doctor said, “Come on back, it’s my Christmas present.” And he sent his helper home for Christmas Eve.

He talked quite a while about his work and how it’s different from most chiropractors. He doesn’t take x-rays. He doesn’t do spinal manipulation. He doesn’t use a lot of force.

That sounded interesting because I’ve been to a chiropractor a few times after messing up my back and this was nothing like other experiences.

He counted up a few vertebrae and pushed. It wasn’t much more than a touch. He checked something with my legs, then went to a different spot on my spine and pushed. In the middle of the back, it was a firm push—a little heavier, but really nothing compared to other treatments I’ve experienced.

This went on for a few vertebrae until he had me step off the table and walk around.

It wasn’t a “throw down your crutches and walk” moment. It still hurt, but it was so much better. Really an amazing difference, especially considering what he did. It really made no sense, but I wasn’t one to complain. I was elated. 

I thanked him profusely, drove away laughing. Not only did he take me in when he was ready to go home for the day, not only did he do it for free (although I later sent him a check), but he really helped me and he did it without listening for that cracking sound as a vertebrae gets adjusted.

He told me his most distant patient lives in Sparta, but that’s only 130 miles away. I want to become his new long-distance guy at 300 miles.

I don’t really. I want to find someone much closer than five hours who does similar work, and that’s my question this week.

You’ve helped me through split fingers and leg cramps. Give me the name of a light-touch chiropractor.

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