2010.01.06 It's back to the back

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

OK, so we’ve gone through the finger splits and the leg cramps. I mentioned the mysterious smell of cigarette smoke when there’s no one around smoking, and, as expected, I received no response on that oddity.

We might as well keep this health thing going. This week: the back. The lower back, to be exact.

Here’s my story. On the Sunday before Christmas, I was wrapping a gift for my wife when I reached across the box and felt it go. Something on the right side of my lower back.

I do this every year or two or three. Sometimes it’s the upper back, sometimes the neck, and this time the lower back. It never happens from lifting something heavy or straining. Instead, it’s a simple act such as lifting a cereal bowl or drying my hair after showering.

This time it was an act of gift-giving, and it was a doozy. I could tell immediately that it wasn’t going to go away. It was Sunday, with the two newspaper days coming up. 

I wore one of those elastic truss things around my waist and walked slowly around the office Monday and Tuesday. Wednesday morning we left for a family Christmas party in East Lansing, then later in the day we drove on north to deliver son, Ben, and his wife, Sarah, to her parents’ house.

Colleen had received an e-mail notice about great deals at Grand Traverse Resort near Traverse City and she signed us up for a couple of nights.

Five hours in the car didn’t do anything good for my back. By then the pain had moved on across to the other side, also. I was a mess.

On Thursday afternoon—Christmas Eve day—I started looking for chiropractors in the area. I wrote down some addresses and headed out in the car. 

I passed one of the offices and it had deep snow in the driveway. I thought I was just having phone problems when a recording told me the number was no longer in service. Two other places were closed and another I couldn’t find. Only one remaining.

I parked in front, walked in and asked if they were still taking appointments. The receptionist asked if I had an appointment. I told them my predicament and the doctor said to come on in. The receptionist didn’t seem too pleased. She was about to walk out the door.

I hurried through some paperwork and asked if they would accept a credit card. The receptionist said, “No;” the doctor said, “Come on back, it’s my Christmas present.” And he sent his helper home for Christmas Eve.

He talked quite a while about his work and how it’s different from most chiropractors. He doesn’t take x-rays. He doesn’t do spinal manipulation. He doesn’t use a lot of force.

That sounded interesting because I’ve been to a chiropractor a few times after messing up my back and this was nothing like other experiences.

He counted up a few vertebrae and pushed. It wasn’t much more than a touch. He checked something with my legs, then went to a different spot on my spine and pushed. In the middle of the back, it was a firm push—a little heavier, but really nothing compared to other treatments I’ve experienced.

This went on for a few vertebrae until he had me step off the table and walk around.

It wasn’t a “throw down your crutches and walk” moment. It still hurt, but it was so much better. Really an amazing difference, especially considering what he did. It really made no sense, but I wasn’t one to complain. I was elated. 

I thanked him profusely, drove away laughing. Not only did he take me in when he was ready to go home for the day, not only did he do it for free (although I later sent him a check), but he really helped me and he did it without listening for that cracking sound as a vertebrae gets adjusted.

He told me his most distant patient lives in Sparta, but that’s only 130 miles away. I want to become his new long-distance guy at 300 miles.

I don’t really. I want to find someone much closer than five hours who does similar work, and that’s my question this week.

You’ve helped me through split fingers and leg cramps. Give me the name of a light-touch chiropractor.

  • Front.geese
    ON THE MOVE—Six goslings head out on manuevers with their parents in an area lake. Baby waterfowl are showing up in lakes and ponds throughout the area.
  • Front.little Ball
    Fayette's Demetrious Whiteside (left)Skylar Lester attempt to keep the ball from going out of bounds during Morenci's recent basketball tournament for fourth and fifth grade teams. Morenci's Andrew Schmidt stands by.
  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2017