2009.12.16 A tough sell on exercising

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

It feels like this is becoming a self-help column. Last week the topic was leg cramps; this week it’s moving into other territory.

But first, an update on leg cramps. After writing about my calf muscles gone wild—and the cure of pointing the toes up toward the head and the prevention by eating bananas—I received a phone call from an anonymous source. She had two words for me: Ivory soap.

She used a few more words to explain. Put a bar of Ivory soap in a sock and place it between the covers in your bed. You will no longer get leg cramps.

She admitted that this sounds a little weird, but she also swore that it works.

I’m not going to do this because I get a leg cramp very rarely and because my wife says she hates the smell of Ivory and refuses to sleep with it.

I think the leg cramp issue is pretty well covered now so let’s move on to the next problem for which I’m seeking assistance: finger splits.

There’s probably another term for this problem, but many of you will know what I’m referring to: when the skin opens up a little near the end of a finger.

It’s a cold weather thing. It seems a little early in the season for these to begin,  but we’ve had an overnight low of 6° and a daytime high of 16° this month—plenty of opportunity for finger splits to start in. My first one opened Thursday. Now I’m typing with a Vaseline laden bandage on my right index finger.

I feel the finger slip around the keyboard. I frequently stop to correct an error from the bandage hitting two keys at once. Before the winter ends, I’ll be using a modified typing system to avoid certain fingers altogether.

With the first occurrence on Dec. 11, I know there’s a lot of pain ahead before spring arrives. I think last season I set a record one week with three coetaneous splits. 

Coetaneous. I’ve never used that word before, but it sounds a little more medical than concomitant or simultaneous.

My treatment consists of applying a dab of Vaseline, comfrey salve or Bag Balm to the wound and wrapping a bandage around it. Then I go to sleep or go to work, or a little of both.

This method has fairly good success, but it’s no instant cure. And I end up going through so many bandages due to showering and hand washing.

I’m also interested in prevention. Maybe I could get a doctor to write a prescription for a move to Miami to live with my son.

I’m ready for another good anonymous phone call telling me what to do about these things. Nothing involving Ivory soap, I hope.

One more thing on the health front. It’s sort of the health front, as far as health implying being alive and death implying the end of health concerns.

Former Morenci resident Scott Porterfield sent a link to the Mortality Calculator from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business.

At the website, you enter information to about 20 questions ranging from the health of family members to facts about your lifestyle. 

Click the button and out comes your life expectancy. For my circumstances, the range is from 78 to 94 years, with an expectancy of 86.32. I might have a long way to go, but then you never know. The questionnaire didn’t even want to know that one of my grandmothers lived to 103.

One of the questions asks what state you live in. I thought for sure I’d get a different number if I answered “Ohio,” but it was the same. I tried a dozen states and my expectancy never changed.

I thought I might be overrating myself, so I added another stress factor. That’s probably more accurate for my job. It was just last week that I announced on the front page that Santa was coming to Fayette on Saturday instead of his actual visit on Friday. That third stress robbed me of an entire year.

I was probably fibbing a little on the sleep factor, too. Better shave off another quarter of a year there, but I could put that back on simply by becoming friends with alcohol. Two or three drinks a day restores that quarter year.

And exercise. I answered truthfully that I’m only an occasional exerciser. If I did better, I could put half a year back on.

All that work for just half a year? It hardly seems worthwhile. Let’s just get a bottle of wine.

  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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