The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.sculpt
    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
  • Front.tar.wide
    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
  • Front.pull
    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.homecoming Court
    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.

2009.11.25 Looking into the larder

Written by David Green.


I saw an interesting challenge listed recently in the Guardian’s Word of Mouth food blog. Readers were asked to try to go a week without shopping for food.

Rather than going out for something fresh, check out the packages in your freezer. Take a look into the back of your cupboards. Use up the item that’s not yet quite out of date in your refrigerator.

It seems as though Colleen and I were taking the challenge a few weeks ago before I even read about it. Last year, just for the “fun” of it, we went until late October without turning on the furnace. This fall we went without shopping. The kids must be so glad they’re gone off on their own when they hear about this stuff.

We didn’t intentionally stop shopping. It was just a busy time and we seemed to always have something better to do than shop.

I don’t recall that we really suffered during that era. We just didn’t eat what might be considered normal. In the past, I’d never looked fondly at Ben’s packet of Larvettes mealworm snacks that he left behind.

The challenge was initially posed by eGullett Society for Culinary Arts & Letters in New York City. The challenger, Steven Shaw (Fat Guy), even listed these rules:

1. No stockpiling. 2. No endangering your children. 3. No making yourself miserable.

Shaw first tried the experiment back in February and 75 people joined in. They managed to eat fairly well for a month without shopping. Wowee. Sounds like a lot of rice and beans.

On the Guardian blog from London, someone looked in their freezer and wrote:

“Well my freezer is currently full of ice cubes and there’s some ice cream in there as well. My cupboard has tomato ketchup, tuna and sweet corn in it. I probably wouldn’t die after a week but I would be %&#*@! hungry.”

Another writes:

“My freezer is full of breast milk. I'll pass, thanks.”

One other:

“There’s only vodka in my freezer. Am sure I could survive a week on just that. Will give it a go.”

Kidney soup, gammon joint, ice lolly coulis, flageolet beans, treacle pudding, sachets of creamed coconut, half a pack of Quorn, sheep’s milk ice cream, goose fat, pigeon pea curry, oven chips, kaffir lime’s stuff you won’t find in my American freezer.

But what oddities are in my kitchen? There are probably a few things to match those British freezers.

The object that surprised me most was a fish. The whole thing. I wonder if Ben caught it a few years ago.

Generally the first thing an observer might notice about our freezer is the preponderance of garbage and banana peels. Banana peels cook easier after they’re frozen.

Actually, we put food garbage in the freezer during the warm months and take it out Thursday night for the trash bag. This method doesn’t feed the fruit flies and the ants, and it doesn’t start to smell in an un-air conditioned house.

There are other inedibles, such as frozen corsages, gel packs, bulk spices and bottles of water to place in a cooler. I would categorize the kids’ leftover pizza kit ingredients as inedible, also.

Fortunately there’s a lot to eat to get through a shopless stretch. Breads, Zingerman’s brownies, veggie burgers, corn, blueberries, butter, Luigi’s Lemon Ice, one Moon Pie and a tequila lollipop with a larva.

In the cupboards there’s rice, lentils, dried beans, nuts, dates, pastas, flour, popcorn, rice cakes, marshmallows, chocolate, tea and condiments. There are potatoes, onions, shallots and good balsamic vinegar. There’s also a bag of amaranth, some Reed’s Ginger Chews and a bottle of True Cherry Boom Chugga Lugga Cola.  It’s a rather high hog on which we could live for several perhaps odd weeks.

I mentioned my freezer search to Chuck Ekins who was over working on a project and he recalled when his wife, Kim, once took what she thought was a ham out of the freezer to thaw. This would have taken the prize on the Guardian blog. You’ll have to ask the Ekins family for details, but when Chuck discovered it on the counter, he had to fess up and tell his wife that it was actually the head of a bear.

There must be a month’s worth of soup stock from that item.

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