The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2009.10.07 If I only had a pulse

Written by David Green.

If I only had a pulse


By DAVID GREEN

The plan sounded really good to me. When Mailman Mark or Mailwoman Nellie walked into the office in the morning, I would be laid out on the Observer’s front counter with a drinking straw attached to my neck.

The straw would twitch with every beat of my heart.

Somewhere I ran across a link to a website called Surfing Science. Within a section called Science Tricks were the directions for making a Straw Heart Monitor.

Very simple. Get a drinking straw and a wad of poster-hanging putty. Poke the straw into the putty, lie on your back and find your pulse in your neck. Set the putty on this spot so the tip of the straw is just above your eye.

“Now watch what happens...it’s a little freaky.”

I certainly wanted to look a little freaky when Mark came in. It would be odd enough to find me spread across the counter, but add to that a twitching straw at my neck...freaky. Just what Mark deserves in the morning as he starts his route through town.

There was only one problem when I tried this out at home. I found a straw and some putty, but couldn’t find any pulse in my neck.

The website says “This cheap little gizmo will open your eyes to the amazing muscle that keeps you alive and kicking.” I felt plenty alive, but I had no kick.

That trick isn’t the only thing that the Science Surfer has to offer. Mark would be equally impressed if I put on an inside-out latex bathing cap in this magical way:

Fill it with water and have someone hold it above your head with both hands. Let it drop (accelerating to 9.8 meters a second).

“Thanks to its incredible surface tension and low viscosity, the water flows around the side of my head and turns the cap inside out.”

Surfing Scientist says there’s a stack of science involved here, most of which still can’t be explained by physicists.

Or maybe I should go with the Freaky Ice Hand. Instructions are provided for creating a hand of ice using a kitchen glove. I would love to have Mark shake hands with one of those.

What happens to youngsters who are taught by Surfing Scientist types of teachers? They probably develop a love for science, but some of them go bad and end up at the Ig Noble Awards.

The 2009 winners were honored Thursday night at Harvard University and, as always, there’s an impressive array of work highlighted.

One study found that full bottles of beer break at a lower impact rate than empty bottles, but both are capable of fracturing the human skull.

Cows that have names give more milk than nameless cows. An analysis determined why pregnant women don’t tip over.

Some Mexican researchers created diamonds in tequila. Japanese scientists demonstrated that kitchen waste can be reduced more than 90 percent in mass by using bacteria extracted from the feces of giant pandas.

In California, a man decided to determine once and for all if knuckle cracking leads to arthritis of the fingers, like your mother always warned you.

He diligently cracked the knuckles of his left hand twice a day for 60 years, but never cracked the knuckles of his right hand.

“I’m looking at my fingers, and there is not the slightest sign of arthritis in either hand,” the researcher said.

Donald Unger, now 83, worked as an allergist over his long career and published many papers, but nothing brought him as much fame as the knuckle work.

“I’ve gotten a lot of awards and degrees, and all of a sudden I get my 15 minutes of fame out of this stupidity,” he said. “But I’m happy to get any award—I've got a blank space on my wall.”

Oh, and one more. A woman invented a brassiere that can be converted into a protective face mask. Actually, into a pair of masks—one for the wearer and one for a bystander in need.

All this good science sent me back to the lab. This time I ran around the house for a bit and watched the straw twitch a little on my wrist. I quickly laid down and got it in place on my neck.

Whoa! Isn’t that freaky!

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