2009.07.15 The tell-tale almond dust

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

My wife is worried that I’m reverting to old behaviors established in my younger days when I was a single man living on my own.

That’s going back quite a while. It must be 27 years or so. Dates and anniversaries—it’s something you have to put your attention on and I don’t. I can tell you that the monarch caterpillars haven’t yet begun depositing eggs on the milkweed. I’ve put my attention on that.

Colleen’s concern about me comes up every now and then, most recently when she packed a lunch for a library event in Chicago.

She reached into the drawer for a plastic sandwich bag and noticed a little residue in it. It was only almond dust. I had packed my lunch that morning and included a little bag of almonds and dark chocolate chips.

I seem to be the chief washer of silverware and plastic bags in this house and I wasn’t about to wash that bag after it had a few almonds in it.

I have to admit, I never expected her to reach into the drawer just a few hours later and pull out that bag to pack a lunch. I figured I would be the next one to use it.

Or maybe she grabbed the carrot bag first. I probably went too far with this one, but the carrots were peeled and washed. They spent about three hours in the baggie before they were removed and ingested. How could you call that bag dirty?

Just by writing that last paragraph I realized the proper course of action. The bags should have been rinsed and hung on the bag drier. There was no need for hot soapy water. Just a quick rinse to remove any almond dust and perhaps to take away that tell-tale orange stain of a few carrot sticks.

That feels good. See, I’m growing in my matrimonial skills. I’m not reverting to bachelorhood after all.

Unfortunately, Colleen also brought up the problem with a food tray. If I place my lunch on a tray to take out of the kitchen, I don’t always wash it off when I’m finished. True, I will admit to that. It doesn’t always need it, but of course I’ve used that line unsuccessfully with plastic bags.

I’m always careful to think about the condition of the tray before I return it to its storage place. I brush off crumbs. I wipe off a spilled liquid if necessary. I certainly don’t place it on the counter to be washed. My obvious error here is that I haven’t been careful enough to remove all  residue.

I’m wondering if the bulk of my failings have to do with washing. My wife has had a lot of trouble with me and washed fruit. I recall that it started late last summer.

Unlike a food tray, I like to wash my fruit. Not bananas, although I live with someone who does wash bananas. Bananas are said to be notoriously dirty, but rather than wash mine, I simply keep my fingers out of my mouth.

I wash apples and pears with Dr. Bronner’s soap. Perhaps some of you are familiar with the wondrous Dr. Bronner’s All-One Magic Soap. “Absolute cleanliness is Godliness!”  “Enjoy only 2 cosmetics, enough sleep and Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soap to clean body-mind-soul-spirit.”

Dr. Bronner’s is something left over from bachelor days and before, but it’s also something that’s part of Colleen’s modern era. I don’t recall if she learned of Bronner’s from me or on her own.

I figure a little Dr. Bronner’s might wash off some pesticide residue from an apple or a plum, but it’s late-summer pears that pose a problem.

Picture a ripe pear in your mind. Mostly yellow but with a few brown spots. Wet the pear, add a drop of Bronner’s, rub it around and rinse. And then wipe it dry on my bath towel.

Colleen has a very large problem with brown stains on a bath towel. It doesn’t bother me. I know it’s just a little pear residue. I like pears. Take a look at all the shampoos and skin washes that my daughters use. Those items are supposedly full of food, judging by the labels.

With the kids gone away and Colleen nearly living at the library during the busy summer reading weeks, I’m spending a lot of time alone. Perhaps I really am reverting to former years. Maybe I’ll just rinse out that bowl from breakfast tomorrow and use it again at lunch. And then at dinner.

  • Front.splash
    Water Fun—Carter Seitz and Colson Walter take a fast trip along a plastic sliding strip while water from a sprinkler provides the lubrication. The boys took a break from tie-dyeing last week at Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program to cool off in the water.
  • Front.starting
    BIKE-A-THON—Children in Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program brought their bikes last Tuesday to participate in a bike-a-thon. Riders await the start of the event at the elementary school before being led on a course through town by organizer Leonie Leahy.
  • Front.pokemon
    LATEST CRAZE—David Cortes (left) and Ty Kruse, along with Jerred Heselschwerdt (standing), consult their smartphones while engaging in the game of Pokémon Go. The virtual scavenger hunt comes to life when players are in the vicinity of gyms, such as Stair District Library, and PokéStops such as the fire station across the street. The boys had spent time Monday morning searching for Pokémon at Wakefield Park.
  • Front.drum
    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
  • Girls.on.ride
    NADIYA YORK and Aniston Valentine take a spin on the Casino, one of the rides offered at Wakefield Park during Morenci’s Town and Country Festival. This year’s festival remained dry but with plenty of heat during the three-day run. Additional photographs are inside this week’s Observer.
  • Front.softball
    Angela Davis (2) and teammate Allison VanBrandt break into a jig after Morenci's softball team won its third consecutive regional title.
  • Front.art.park
    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016