The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2009.07.15 The tell-tale almond dust

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

My wife is worried that I’m reverting to old behaviors established in my younger days when I was a single man living on my own.

That’s going back quite a while. It must be 27 years or so. Dates and anniversaries—it’s something you have to put your attention on and I don’t. I can tell you that the monarch caterpillars haven’t yet begun depositing eggs on the milkweed. I’ve put my attention on that.

Colleen’s concern about me comes up every now and then, most recently when she packed a lunch for a library event in Chicago.

She reached into the drawer for a plastic sandwich bag and noticed a little residue in it. It was only almond dust. I had packed my lunch that morning and included a little bag of almonds and dark chocolate chips.

I seem to be the chief washer of silverware and plastic bags in this house and I wasn’t about to wash that bag after it had a few almonds in it.

I have to admit, I never expected her to reach into the drawer just a few hours later and pull out that bag to pack a lunch. I figured I would be the next one to use it.

Or maybe she grabbed the carrot bag first. I probably went too far with this one, but the carrots were peeled and washed. They spent about three hours in the baggie before they were removed and ingested. How could you call that bag dirty?

Just by writing that last paragraph I realized the proper course of action. The bags should have been rinsed and hung on the bag drier. There was no need for hot soapy water. Just a quick rinse to remove any almond dust and perhaps to take away that tell-tale orange stain of a few carrot sticks.

That feels good. See, I’m growing in my matrimonial skills. I’m not reverting to bachelorhood after all.

Unfortunately, Colleen also brought up the problem with a food tray. If I place my lunch on a tray to take out of the kitchen, I don’t always wash it off when I’m finished. True, I will admit to that. It doesn’t always need it, but of course I’ve used that line unsuccessfully with plastic bags.

I’m always careful to think about the condition of the tray before I return it to its storage place. I brush off crumbs. I wipe off a spilled liquid if necessary. I certainly don’t place it on the counter to be washed. My obvious error here is that I haven’t been careful enough to remove all  residue.

I’m wondering if the bulk of my failings have to do with washing. My wife has had a lot of trouble with me and washed fruit. I recall that it started late last summer.

Unlike a food tray, I like to wash my fruit. Not bananas, although I live with someone who does wash bananas. Bananas are said to be notoriously dirty, but rather than wash mine, I simply keep my fingers out of my mouth.

I wash apples and pears with Dr. Bronner’s soap. Perhaps some of you are familiar with the wondrous Dr. Bronner’s All-One Magic Soap. “Absolute cleanliness is Godliness!”  “Enjoy only 2 cosmetics, enough sleep and Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soap to clean body-mind-soul-spirit.”

Dr. Bronner’s is something left over from bachelor days and before, but it’s also something that’s part of Colleen’s modern era. I don’t recall if she learned of Bronner’s from me or on her own.

I figure a little Dr. Bronner’s might wash off some pesticide residue from an apple or a plum, but it’s late-summer pears that pose a problem.

Picture a ripe pear in your mind. Mostly yellow but with a few brown spots. Wet the pear, add a drop of Bronner’s, rub it around and rinse. And then wipe it dry on my bath towel.

Colleen has a very large problem with brown stains on a bath towel. It doesn’t bother me. I know it’s just a little pear residue. I like pears. Take a look at all the shampoos and skin washes that my daughters use. Those items are supposedly full of food, judging by the labels.

With the kids gone away and Colleen nearly living at the library during the busy summer reading weeks, I’m spending a lot of time alone. Perhaps I really am reverting to former years. Maybe I’ll just rinse out that bowl from breakfast tomorrow and use it again at lunch. And then at dinner.

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