The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Front.sculpt
    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
  • Front.tar.wide
    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
  • Front.pull
    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.homecoming Court
    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.

2009.07.01 Popcorn, a tree and fireworks

Written by David Green.


At 10 p.m. on Saturday night of the Morenci Town & County Festival, I’m always at Wakefield Park. For years and years, that’s where I’ve been—until this weekend.

I watched the fireworks show; I just wasn’t at the park.

I made it to the Battle of the Bands on Friday night. It’s an interesting show, and not just for the listening but for the people watching. It seems there are many people—spanning several decades in age—who don’t particularly care if they’re listening to a kid scream against the sound of a raucous guitar. They just like to be there to witness amateur musicians standing up to make music.

I took some softball photos and carnival ride photos in a nice evening sun, went home for a while before returning for the arm wrestling. One of the competitors kept spitting on the ground and I kept nudging my camera bag further out of the way.

I made it to the parade the next morning, missed the Make-Over presentation, got a corn hole photo and another from the Child ID program. Then I made the trek back to the NWD building to witness the spectacle of what’s called wrestling.

Wrestling? There must be other words to describe this show. I’ve never been drunk before, but I assume that in the proper state of inebriation, this could be quite amusing.

I got a few photos and returned home to recover before Cody “HiZe” Long gave his rap performance. And then back home before Charles Elliot performed.

I needed to get back to the park a little early to get a photo of Elliot and fund-raiser supreme Bonnie Kime. She really wanted Charles Elliot at the festival so she raised the money to pay his fee.

If you were there, thank Bonnie for the excellent show. He’s a great entertainer.

Before Charles Elliot came on stage, his band, “The Benders,” played a few tunes including Van Morrison’s “Brown Eyed Girl.” Just when they got to the line “like a dove...” a mourning dove flew over the audience. Excellent timing, I thought, but later I looked at the lyrics and learned that for 40 years I had misheard the words. There is no “like a dove”; it’s only “lah tee dah.”

I got my photos and, of course, returned home because being at the festival means I’m working. It’s a busy weekend.

I was sitting here at my computer when the opening blasts went off signaling the start of the fireworks show.

Joe Farquhar had come into the office a few times recently to give updates on the fireworks fund-raising effort. Five thousand bucks. We joked about how the 19-minute show would cost $263 a minute.

I was surprised how loud the blasts were even at my house. I picked up the bowl of popcorn I had just made and walked to the sidewalk. I could see the light through the trees and walked south for a better view. The funeral home staff recently had the final tree cut down on its property. A blight on the landscape that offered good fireworks viewing.

I leaned against my neighbor’s tree and was astounded at how good the show was from that distance. Especially with a bowl of popcorn.

After the first couple thousand dollars blew up, I was getting a little critical. It seemed that too many of the blasts were repeats. I wanted more diversity for the next thousand.

There was some new stuff every now and then, but not enough.

My favorite wasn’t the fast bursts of color that shot out across the sky. I liked a particular slow moving release. It was like a handful of white comets were thrown upward, but they were almost at their apex and losing speed and they soon reached the point where they cascaded back toward earth.

You can look at the show as $263 a minute, but that’s a little skewed. The grand finale always comes through at about $500 a second.

For the first part of the show, I could only see it. For the finale, I could feel the percussion all the way over on Summit Street. What a blast.

And even from my neighbor’s tree, I could hear the applause and cheers erupt at the park when it ended. Then came one final treat: no traffic jam. I was home in 16 seconds.

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