2009.06.17 It's a sad situation

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

It’s such a sad thing to realize at 10 p.m. on a Monday that I never got around to writing a By The Way column. So sad.

It was a very busy weekend and I was gone away much more than I was home. I meant to get to it Sunday afternoon, but that didn’t happen. Then it just slipped my mind during a busy Monday.

So I wrote one tonight and I was so thoroughly bored by it that I refuse to use it. The Deli just closed up, meaning that it’s now midnight and the situation is now even sadder.

I wandered to the back office and looked at the archive book from 20 years ago and saw a headline reading, “My pillow is ruined.”

Here are the details:

“Life just hasn’t been the same since Rosanna threw up on my pillow.

I don’t have much to back up that statement, other than a sore neck from the scrawny substitute headrest I’m using, but I thought it made an interesting opening.”

June 14, 1989, when there were kids throwing up in the house.

If it wasn’t throw-up, it was baseball cards. They were gaining importance in our house that summer.

“In my opinion, baseball cards are right up there with the other big addictions and vices in life, such as chewing tobacco and nose-picking. Once a kid gets that first taste, it’s all over.

I don’t know what came first—Ben’s discovery of baseball cards or his realization that he could make money helping me address papers on Tuesday nights. The two are very closely related. I remember the time I left him home to play baseball instead of telling him the papers were back from the printer. Boy, did I ever hear about that one. I had to run out and buy him a pack to get him off my case.

Besides the financial drain, I tire of Ben pouncing on any house guest who comes in: You want to see my baseball cards?

Before there’s time for an answer, the guest is involved in helping him arrange his collection in reverse alphabetical order, by position played and color of hat.

There’s only one thing that might save him from the evil of cards, and that’s fishing. He thinks a baseball card might make a heck of a muskie lure. That’s no worse than his famous zucchini lure of last summer.”

In the summer of 1989, Ben was six years old, Rosie was four and Maddie had reached six months. Column writing came easier. I could ask a question, wait for an answer and start writing.

“I popped the big question to Rosanna recently: What do you want to be when you grow up?

She had a ready answer: Go to the park all by myself.

It’s easy to see what’s important in her life. Ben had to think a while before coming up with fireman for an answer. Too bad he didn’t know me way back when I wanted to be a fire truck. We could have made a great team.

My wife says that when she grows up, she would like to be able to eat chocolate without having the caffeine affect a nursing baby. It’s easy to see what’s important in Colleen’s life, too.

For the baby herself, she’s reached that stage where everything goes into the mouth, from grass to rubber snakes and toy bats. And why not? She sits there watching us stuff things into our mouths at least three times a day. Looks like fun.”

And so it went in 1989. I noticed this morning we have three toothbrushes in the holder again. That’s because the baby, Maddie, was here for a brief visit before going away again as she often does these days.

She finished a class in northern Michigan and is now back in Ann Arbor for a summer job. I wasn’t involved in the move on Monday afternoon, but Colleen came back with a worrisome report about the messy house where Maddie is subletting a room. It sounds like typical student housing to me, but Colleen says it’s much worse. She hated to leave her daughter behind.

If I was writing this a day earlier, I could have given Maddie her turn and asked her what she wants to do when she grows up. Walk to the park? Eat chocolate?

There’s something even sadder than not having a column at midnight on Monday. It’s wandering to the back office at midnight and reading about how things were 20 years ago.

  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Front.sculpta
    SCULPTORS—Morenci third grade students Emersyn Thompson (left) and Marissa Lawrence turn spaghetti sticks into mini sculptures Friday during a class visit to Stair District Library. All Morenci Elementary School classes recently visited the library to experience the creative construction toys purchased through the “Sculptamania!” project, funded by a Disney Curiosity Creates grant. The grant is administered by the Association for Library Services to Children, a division of the American Library Association.
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • Shadow.salon
    LEARNING THE ROPES—Kristy Castillo (left), co-owner of Mane Street Salon, works with Kendal Kuhn as Sierra Orner takes a phone call. The two Morenci Area High School juniors spent Friday at the salon as part of a job shadowing experience.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.

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