2009.06.17 It's a sad situation

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

It’s such a sad thing to realize at 10 p.m. on a Monday that I never got around to writing a By The Way column. So sad.

It was a very busy weekend and I was gone away much more than I was home. I meant to get to it Sunday afternoon, but that didn’t happen. Then it just slipped my mind during a busy Monday.

So I wrote one tonight and I was so thoroughly bored by it that I refuse to use it. The Deli just closed up, meaning that it’s now midnight and the situation is now even sadder.

I wandered to the back office and looked at the archive book from 20 years ago and saw a headline reading, “My pillow is ruined.”

Here are the details:

“Life just hasn’t been the same since Rosanna threw up on my pillow.

I don’t have much to back up that statement, other than a sore neck from the scrawny substitute headrest I’m using, but I thought it made an interesting opening.”

June 14, 1989, when there were kids throwing up in the house.

If it wasn’t throw-up, it was baseball cards. They were gaining importance in our house that summer.

“In my opinion, baseball cards are right up there with the other big addictions and vices in life, such as chewing tobacco and nose-picking. Once a kid gets that first taste, it’s all over.

I don’t know what came first—Ben’s discovery of baseball cards or his realization that he could make money helping me address papers on Tuesday nights. The two are very closely related. I remember the time I left him home to play baseball instead of telling him the papers were back from the printer. Boy, did I ever hear about that one. I had to run out and buy him a pack to get him off my case.

Besides the financial drain, I tire of Ben pouncing on any house guest who comes in: You want to see my baseball cards?

Before there’s time for an answer, the guest is involved in helping him arrange his collection in reverse alphabetical order, by position played and color of hat.

There’s only one thing that might save him from the evil of cards, and that’s fishing. He thinks a baseball card might make a heck of a muskie lure. That’s no worse than his famous zucchini lure of last summer.”

In the summer of 1989, Ben was six years old, Rosie was four and Maddie had reached six months. Column writing came easier. I could ask a question, wait for an answer and start writing.

“I popped the big question to Rosanna recently: What do you want to be when you grow up?

She had a ready answer: Go to the park all by myself.

It’s easy to see what’s important in her life. Ben had to think a while before coming up with fireman for an answer. Too bad he didn’t know me way back when I wanted to be a fire truck. We could have made a great team.

My wife says that when she grows up, she would like to be able to eat chocolate without having the caffeine affect a nursing baby. It’s easy to see what’s important in Colleen’s life, too.

For the baby herself, she’s reached that stage where everything goes into the mouth, from grass to rubber snakes and toy bats. And why not? She sits there watching us stuff things into our mouths at least three times a day. Looks like fun.”

And so it went in 1989. I noticed this morning we have three toothbrushes in the holder again. That’s because the baby, Maddie, was here for a brief visit before going away again as she often does these days.

She finished a class in northern Michigan and is now back in Ann Arbor for a summer job. I wasn’t involved in the move on Monday afternoon, but Colleen came back with a worrisome report about the messy house where Maddie is subletting a room. It sounds like typical student housing to me, but Colleen says it’s much worse. She hated to leave her daughter behind.

If I was writing this a day earlier, I could have given Maddie her turn and asked her what she wants to do when she grows up. Walk to the park? Eat chocolate?

There’s something even sadder than not having a column at midnight on Monday. It’s wandering to the back office at midnight and reading about how things were 20 years ago.

  • Front.bridge Cross
    STEP BY STEP—Wyatt Stevens of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge Sunday during the Michigan DNR’s Great Outdoors Jamboree at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The Tecumseh Boy Scout Troop constructed the bridge again this year after taking a break in 2016. The Jamboree offered a variety of activities for a wide range of age groups. Morenci’s Stair District Library set up activities again this year and had visits with dozens of kids. See the back page for additional photos.
  • Front.bridge.17
    LEADING THE WAY—The Morenci Area High School marching band led the way across the pedestrian bridge on Morenci’s south side for the annual Labor Day Bridge Walk. The Band Boosters shared profits from the sale of T-shirts with the walk’s sponsor, the Morenci Area Chamber of Commerce. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.eclipse
    LOOKING UP—More than 200 people showed up at Stair District Library Monday afternoon to view the big celestial event with free glasses provided by a grant from the Space Science Institute. The library offered craft activities from noon to 1 p.m., refreshments including Cosmic Cake from Zingerman’s Bakehouse and a live viewing of the eclipse from NASA on a large screen. As the sky darkened slightly, more and more people moved outside to the sidewalk to take a look at the shrinking sun. If you missed it, hang on for the next total eclipse in 2024 as the path comes even closer to this area.
  • Cecil
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    TAKE A BREAK—Last Wednesday’s session of Stair District Library’s Summer Reading Program ended with a quiet period in a class presented by yoga instructor Melany Gladieux of Toledo. Children learned a variety of yoga poses in the main room at the library, then finished off the session relaxing. Additional photos are on page 7. Area children are invited to visit the library today when the Michigan Science Center presents a flight program at 11 a.m. and roller coasters at 1 p.m.
  • Front.batter
    THE DERBY—Tyler “Smallpox” Flakne of Minnesota’s Home Run League All-Stars goes for the fence Friday night during the National Wiffle League Association’s home run derby in Morenci. This year the wiffleball national tournament moved from Dublin, Ohio, to Morenci’s Wakefield Park. During the derby, competitors had two minutes to hit as many home runs as possible. The winner this year finished with 21. See page 6 and 7 for additional photos.
  • Front.green Screen
    OUT OF THIS WORLD—Elizabeth McFadden and Elise Christle pose in front of the green screen as VolunTeen Noah Gilson makes them appear as though they are standing on the Moon. More photos from the Stair District Library’s NASA @ My Library program are on page 12.
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    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
  • Front.batter

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