The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2009.06.03 All those hatless heads

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

I saw such a funny sight at the state track meet Saturday. I should have noticed it in the past, but I think the sun made the difference.

I was standing near the high jump pit when the National Anthem was played—wait a minute, since when was there a pit at the high jump event? Fifty years ago?

And now I feel another digression coming on. I just don’t understand the concept of playing the National Anthem at every sporting event in the country. Why are we reminded of the rockets red glare before the hockey puck is dropped? Why are we given the image of bombs bursting in air before the first pitch is thrown?

Suppose all four stanzas of Francis Scott Key’s poem were used?

On the shore dimly seen thro’ the mists of the deep,

Where the foe’s haughty host in dread silence reposes,

What is that which the breeze, o’er the towering steep,

As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?

I’ve heard it played so many times over so many years of sports coverage that I now quickly assess how each version is going to play out. Will it be one of those really s-l-o-w deliveries that seem to drag on forever or will it come through as a peppier rendition?

At high school football games, it’s almost always live. A school band shows its skills or lack thereof. At high school basketball games, a pep band might provide the music or—I really dread this one—a student, almost always a female, will sing the song.

Twenty years ago it might have been sung, either well or badly, in a straightforward manner. Now, the singer has to mimic some singing star who shows off with a range of tones instead of a single note. It’s like turning a one-syllable word into one with five.

And the crowd loves it and I realize, once again, that I really don’t belong in that gymnasium, that I really don’t deserve to hear the performance, that I’m just a jaded, tired old misanthrope who can’t control his cynicism. But it’s my job and I must be there.

No refuge could save the hireling and slave

From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave.

So there I was Saturday at Forest Hills Eastern High School awaiting the National Anthem. Actually, it was the second time of the day. “The perilous fight” was played out in the morning before the first heat of the 100-meter dash preliminaries.

That was back when I first started reading the slogan shirts that are responsible for athletes’ performances. A lot of those kids never would have made it to the state meet if they hadn’t worn a T-shirt all season that read: “Do work son.” I think on the front it read “Commas are overrated.”

How about this: “My blood, my sweat, your tears.”

Here’s another: “Run hard or run home.”

A Christian school turned to the Old Testament to urge its athletes to “run with endurance.” How about this Bible message T-shirt: “Teach the older men to be temperate, worthy of respect, self-controlled, and sound in faith, in love and in endurance.”

So I’ve been to too many sporting events in the past 30 years.

OK, I was standing by the high jump mound waiting for Phoenix Duncan to do her thing. She had already fallen short of her best in the long jump and was probably hoping to make up for it in the high jump.

She approaches the bar almost dead-on rather from the side and I was standing off to the side so I wouldn’t be in her view.

But it was time for the Star Spangled Banner and gentlemen were asked to remove their hats to show respect.  Women, on the other hand, were allowed to wear their hats because head-gear on a woman shows no disrespect.

All right, I won’t go into that. I’m probably already due letters to the editor accusing me of being unpatriotic.

The music began. It was moderate in speed, but it was done so well that it didn’t matter if it dragged. Wonderful brass.

I couldn’t look up at the flag because of the position of the sun, so I looked straight ahead and saw hundreds of men without their caps. It was hilarious. Men always wear hats at sporting events. Bald spots, funny hat hair, matted down hair...all these strangely uncovered heads all o’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

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