2009.03.25 Tom has the travel bug

Written by David Green.

My brother, Tom, must have made the mistake of asking if I needed any help while he visited last week. Of course I suggested that he write a column. He accomplished the task while riding the train between Jackson and Chicago.


By TOM GREEN

This year’s flu shot did a good job at keeping away illness but it didn’t prevent the travel bug from seeping back into the blood of my wife and me. We couldn’t resist the opportunity to return to Southeast Asia to teach for two years at Jakarta International School in Indonesia.

From 1999-2002, Ginny and I taught at an international school in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, allowing our family the chance to explore and experience living in another culture as well as traveling extensively throughout Southeast Asia.

Now that our two daughters are established in college, this seemed like an excellent time to make another foray to further experience and travel in this area of the world we came to love.

Indonesia is a country made up of approximately 17,500 islands. We will be living on the second largest of them, Java, amidst 13 million other people in the capital city of Jakarta. Most of the islands are heavily populated, as Indonesia is the fourth most populated country in the world.

The country is predominately Muslim, making it the answer to a trivia question: What is the Muslim country with the largest population? Ginny and I look forward to exploring the islands and the surrounding waters. Indonesia offers some of the world’s finest coral reefs, a natural resource that is rapidly shrinking.

Knowing I would be out of the country for a while, I took advantage of my current school’s spring break and traveled back home to Morenci to visit family. I found cheap flights from my home in Minnesota to Chicago and booked Amtrak from Chicago’s Union Station to Jackson’s train depot, which I found out to be the second oldest train depot still in use in the country!

If you aren’t worried about arrival time, Amtrak is a great way to travel. The tracks between Chicago and Jackson pass by the steel plants of Gary, hug the Lake Michigan coast, often follow rivers, and wind their way through woods and farms of southern Michigan.

I took along a GPS unit and discovered Amtrak occasionally reaches over 80 miles per hour, but more often it’s not going quite that fast. Apparently the freights rule the rails, as we had to stop once in a while to let other trains through.

Here are a few suggestions to make your Amtrak trip more comfortable: be flexible on your arrival time, the temperature varies so dress in layers, and pack a lunch for the best food.

It was good to be back in my hometown. Some things always remain the same and others are shocking to the occasional visitor. I can’t get used to Parker Rust Proof disappearing from sight. I remember as a child PRP being such a massive structure and now there is no evidence that it actually existed. I remember one school year when students were bussed there during a tornado warning. It was the only time I was ever inside the complex. I did spend a lot of time biking on Mill Street, occasionally stopping to release some pressure on the brake valves on the train cars.

I got in some hikes along the Bean last week, admiring the annual spring-cleaning by the floodwaters. David and I discovered some areas of fossil laden pebbles newly exposed by the flood. Returning from Riverside Park, I stopped for a visit to the Old Cemetery, once with my brother and once with my sister. Each time we left with many questions. Was there an influenza epidemic in 1847 that accounts for the many deaths that year? How can there be a grave as old as 1810? Is there a record of the burials? How many of the trees were planted after it became a graveyard? History is quickly eroding away on those old gravestones.

Once I satiate my travel bug in Asia, I will be back to Morenci’s Old Cemetery to feed my history bug. It seems no matter where I travel—to Java, the historic Jackson depot, Bean Creek, or the old cemetery—there are discoveries waiting to be made.

  • Play Practice
    DRAMA—Fayette schools, in conjunction with the Opera House Theater program, will present two plays Friday night at the Fayette Opera House. From the left is Autumn Black, Wyatt Mitchell, Elizabeth Myers, Jonah Perdue, Sam Myers (in the back) and Lauren Dale. Other cast members are Brynn Balmer, Mason Maginn, Ashtyn Dominique, Stephanie Munguia and Sierra Munguia. Jason Stuckey serves as the technician and Trinity Leady is the backstage manager. The plays will be performed during the day Friday for students and for the public at 7 p.m. Friday.
  • Front.F.school
    PROGRESS continues on the agriculture classroom addition at Fayette High School. The project will add 2,900 square feet of space and include an overhead door that would allow equipment to be driven inside. The building should be ready for the start of school in August. Work on ball fields and a running track is also underway.
  • Front.rover
    CLEARING THE WAY—Road crossings in the area on the construction route of the Rover natural gas pipeline are marked with poles and flags as preliminary work nears. Ditches and field entry points are covered with thick planks in many areas to support equipment for tree clearing operations. Actual pipeline construction is progressing across Ohio toward a collecting station near Defiance. That segment of the project is expected to wrap up in July. The 42-inch line through Michigan and into Ontario is scheduled for completion in November. The line is projected to transport 3.25 billion cubic feet of natural gas every day.
  • Front.geese
    ON THE MOVE—Six goslings head out on manuevers with their parents in an area lake. Baby waterfowl are showing up in lakes and ponds throughout the area.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.
  • Face Paint
    FUN NIGHT FUN—Savanna Miles sits patiently while Abbie White works on a face paint design Friday during the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Gracie Snead watches the progress after having spent time in the chair. Abbie was one of several volunteer painters, each creating their own unique look. Additional photos are on the back page of this week’s Observer.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2017