The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2009.02.25 Friendly help in a.m.

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

I remember when I used to have trouble getting to sleep. That was sometime back in my 20s I think and then again for a while later in my adult life.

Now, it seems, I need about two minutes and I’m gone. There is an exception to that. If I doze off a little before going to bed and then get up to go back to sleep, I’m probably going to be awake for a long time. It’s that initial fatigue that sends me off.

It also happens if I’ve just gotten to sleep and the phone rings. It often puts me back into an alert stage. It’s the same thing if I’m about to doze off and then She Who Stays Up For Hours decides to come up and talk. She can be a sleep-wrecker.

We have such vastly different styles of sleep. For Colleen, going to bed at midnight is turning in early. For me, midnight means I’m going to suffer the next day.

For me, I get up in the morning. I wake up and I get up. I couldn’t sleep in if I tried. For her, just change those sentences around. In the morning she can’t get up. She wakes up and she...well, she doesn’t wake up. She sleeps in with no effort.

Apparently she suffers from sleep inertia. Her condition results in the inability to move and a drowsy request to know what time it is. She isn’t able to open her eyes and look at the clock. The radio/alarm is playing but she isn’t yet able to listen and comprehend the words.

There’s a quick solution for my wife’s sleep inertia, but I’m not confident that I’m fast enough to pull it off. You simply have to rip the covers off her and run downstairs before she grabs you and begins clawing out your eyes. I learned the hard way how expensive it is to get an eye transplant.

I read this morning about some sleep studies that question the typical model of dozing off. In the past, scientists thought there was a control center that told the brain when it was time to shut down and rest. A newer study suggests that various parts of the brain fall asleep independently and real sleep occurs when enough areas have powered down.

That might explain sleep walking, which is something I don’t think I’ve ever participated in. I think it was John Bryner who said that one of his parents witnessed him riding his tricycle back up to the house after a night-time sleep ride. Someone else told the story about mistakenly confusing the refrigerator for the toilet while sleepwalking. Weird stuff.

The researchers also think that sleep inertia fits into their new model of sleep. Parts of the brain are awake while other parts are still shut down. For some, the simple act of removing a quilt awakens many portions at once and triggers an aggression response.

Maybe this relates to other recent studies of poor sleep and mental illness. The old model is that people with mental problems typically have poor sleep patterns. The new model suggests that poor sleep may lead to psychiatric disorders. Or, in the least, poor sleep might lead to behavior that’s mistakenly diagnosed as a mental problem.

Poor sleep can lead to depression in adults. Children diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are much more likely to be poor sleepers than other children. They’re treated with Ritalin instead of addressing a sleep apnea problem.

The studies are all very interesting, with discussions of brain chemicals and rapid eye movement (REM) and the processing of daily memories to remove the emotional edges.

Maybe I’ll do a little research of my own. All I need is a willing—or at least sleeping—subject, and I do have access to that.

One of my sleep research colleagues reports that a good sleep with REM refreshes our civilizing emotional reactions, that it resets the magnetic north of our emotional compass.

Civilizing? My first step is make sure all the doors I need to pass through are wide open, make sure the floors are clear of anything that might trip me up, and to make sure my swim goggles are tightly fitting over my eyes.

I should probably have the front door of the house open, too, and maybe the car engine running.

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