2008.12.04 I put on for my city (by Talyor Ballinger)

Written by David Green.

Guest column by TAYLOR BALLINGER

As a high school teacher, I get the opportunity to listen to genres of music that I normally wouldn’t take note of. If a song or an album will inspire my students or give them something to connect to, then I’ll play it.

The rap artist Young Jeezy recently released a hit single titled “Put On,” wherein he says “I put on for my city, on on for my city.” I’m not exactly sure what this means (no real surprise there), but I think Young Jeezy is saying he has pride for the city he lives in.

Coming from a small town in Kentucky, I found a lot of reasons to not be proud of where I was from. “Everyone’s too country!” I’d complain. Let’s face it, when the most common statement you hear is “Kentucky? They have indoor plumbing now?” it doesn’t exactly invoke a sense of pride in where you’re from.

Since moving away from home, however, I have developed a strong love for my home region. My friends often mock me saying, “Hi, my name is Taylor and I love two things in this world: Kentucky, and Rozee. You figure out the order.”

I guess I’ve developed that love for a place that only comes with time spent away. Love for things like hiking trails, fall colors, and Sunday afternoons at home with the family.

 When I moved to New Orleans a year and a half ago, something strange happened. With Kentucky, it took leaving home to find my pride. But with New Orleans, I fell in love the day I moved in. I don’t always recognize my connection with this city.

The first time I really noticed it was when Rozee and I were re-entering the city following our evacuation for Hurricane Gustav. When I saw that sign that said “Welcome to Louisiana,” I almost cried with joy. “Almost home,” I thought.

During Thanksgiving week, my love for this city became apparent to me once more. Rozee and I played the roles of tour guides in our own city, something I’d recommend for anyone looking for a reason to find the beauty and greatness in where you live.

For nine straight days we had visitors, and so for nine straight days we went places that we normally don’t go.

We went to the zoo, the aquarium, two art museums, and to the French Quarter about once a day. We took Colleen, David, and Maddie to the Bayou Classic Battle of the Bands, a “battle” of marching bands from two famous HBCU’s (Historically Black College or University) in Louisiana—Southern and Grambling. We walked around parks and we saw the world famous blues man Big Al Carson.

It wasn’t until we drove the Leddy-Greens around the areas most affected by Hurricane Katrina, though, that I really felt that cosmic connection with the city again. In the Lower Ninth Ward there are still acres of green lots with nothing more than foundations where homes once stood, but that’s a sign of progress.

When Rozee and I first came down here, there was still some debris and houses waiting to be gutted or bulldozed. In Lakeview, homes are being re-built in large numbers. City Park, which was the last area to be drained of floodwaters, is green and is transforming its old golf course into walking trails and a fishing pond.

The city is bouncing back, and that makes me proud. Maybe I’m proud because I feel like I’m a small part of the revitalization of this place. I don’t do much, really. I teach a small number of kids who were displaced by Katrina. I go to Saints football games and Hornets basketball games, teams that give back to the community and provide a rallying point for its citizens.

Rozee is involved in helping some of the most-devastated communities get prepared for the next storm. And we’re both dedicated to telling people that New Orleans is a city rich with culture and a resiliency that should make every American proud.

We eat good food, listen to good music, and find any reason imaginable to throw a party. We’ll keep fighting to preserve Louisiana’s wetlands (natural “speed-bumps” to hurricane storm surges), and we’ll gladly have you down for Mardi Gras or Jazz Fest or Voodoo Fest.

If you need more convincing of why I love this place so much, just ask someone who’s been here. Or come on down. I think Colleen and David were worried that I was tired of visitors last week. Nothing could be further from the truth. I’ll “put on” for this city any day of the week.

  • Front.pokemon
    LATEST CRAZE—David Cortes (left) and Ty Kruse, along with Jerred Heselschwerdt (standing), consult their smartphones while engaging in the game of Pokémon Go. The virtual scavenger hunt comes to life when players are in the vicinity of gyms, such as Stair District Library, and PokéStops such as the fire station across the street. The boys had spent time Monday morning searching for Pokémon at Wakefield Park.
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    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
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    NADIYA YORK and Aniston Valentine take a spin on the Casino, one of the rides offered at Wakefield Park during Morenci’s Town and Country Festival. This year’s festival remained dry but with plenty of heat during the three-day run. Additional photographs are inside this week’s Observer.
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    Angela Davis (2) and teammate Allison VanBrandt break into a jig after Morenci's softball team won its third consecutive regional title.
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    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
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    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
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    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
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    BEVY OF BALLS—Stair District Library Summer Reading Program VolunTeens, including Libby Rorick, back left and Ty Kruse, back right, threw a dozen inflatable soccer balls into the crowd during a reading of “Sergio Saves the Game.” The sports-themed program continues on Wednesdays through July 27.
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