2008.11.12 The guts of the matter

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Start with the crook of you elbow. Looks clean. Maybe you just took a shower so you know it’s clean.

Sure, but that depends on your definition of “clean.” There’s a lot of bacteria living there—six tribes of bacteria make their home in your elbow.

Wash it off with soap and there are still a few hanging around, like about a million in each patch of skin the size of your fingernail.

This shouldn’t bother you. Don’t go to work with the antibacterial soap, because bacteria doesn’t equate to dirty. You can have a very clean elbow pit and still serve as a kind host to millions and millions of bacteria.

And all those little guys give back to you. They eat the fats that your skin gives off and that helps moisturize the skin.

Biologists call these bacteria commensals. It’s from an old Latin word meaning that everyone eats at the same table. You help them; they help you.

Now if you move down the arm a few inches you’ll discover a new set of bacteria, a few different tribes. When scientists check out a sample of people, they find that most everyone has the same tribes in various parts of the bodies. There are at least 20 different niche areas of the skin for bacteria groups to reside and about 500 different species of bacteria.

There’s a lot going on out on the skin, but that’s only the outside and we’re just getting started. Bacteria cells outnumber our own human cells by about 10 to 1. We’re a minority in our body.

Of course it doesn’t start out that way. An unborn baby has a sterile gut, but it picks up stuff immediately through the birth canal, through breast-feeding, through a parent’s touch, etc. Bacteria take over quickly and make themselves quite at home. There are trillions and trillions of bacteria living in our gut, and that’s the way it’s supposed to be.

Where is this tale going? Well, let me tell you right now, in case you have something better to do, it really isn’t going anywhere. I’m simply fascinated by this subject and I have to tell it to somebody.

In the program I was listening to, it was explained that humans are designed to fully digest seeds. It takes gut bacteria to get the job done, but gut bacteria varies from place to place

Take oats, for example. Someone living in Brazil might get about 80 percent of the protein out of oats. An Inuit living in the far north is likely to get about 98 percent of the protein. Different cultures, different gut bacteria.

Now scientists are looking at obesity from the prospective of what’s known as your intestinal floral. You know how some people can eat and eat and eat and never gain any weight. Their bacteria aren’t breaking down the food as efficiently; a lot of the value is just passing on through.

This brings up the question of obesity and gut bacteria. Can obesity and certain diseases be controlled by changing the bacteria present? A fascinating new field of study has begun. What should stay and what should go?

Critics of this approach are going to frown upon changing your flora to accommodate bad eating habits. It makes you wonder what the normal, correct flora to have inside.

When my friend Willie Mow last visited, he talked a lot about what’s known as the Paleolithic Diet. Some people call it the Caveman Diet or the Hunter/Gatherer Diet. It refers to the diet that humans ate for the first couple million years of their existence, before agriculture was developed.

Out with the grains, legumes, dairy products, salt, refined sugar, and processed oils; in with lean meat, fish, vegetables, fruit, roots, and nuts. In other words, out with most everything you probably eat now; in with what you should be eating.

Supposedly, it’s the fuel that we were designed to live on. It’s the fuel that our gut bacteria would be happiest with.

So think like a cave man. Go out and bring down a squirrel. You’ll hear little songs of joy emitting from your intestine.

  • Homecoming Court
    HOMECOMING—One senior candidate will be chosen Morenci’s fall homecoming queen during half-time ceremonies Friday at the football field. In the back row are seniors Mikayla Price, who will be escorted by Mason Vaughn; Madison Bachman, escorted by Kiegan Merillat, and Mikayla Reinke, escorted by Griffin Grieder. Senior Ariana Roseman is absent from the photo. Her escort is Garrett Smith. In the front is sophomore Abbie White, who will be escorted by Ryder Price; junior Madysen Schmitz, escorted by Harley McCaskey and freshman Madison Keller, escorted by Jarett Cook.
  • Front.cross
    HUDSON RUNNER Jacob Morgan looks toward the top of the hill with dismay during the tough finish at Harrison Lake State Park. Fayette runner Jacob Garrow focuses on the summit, also, during the Eagle Invitational cross country run Saturday morning. Continuing rain and drizzle made the course even more challenging. Results of the race are in this week’s Observer.
  • Front.bear
    HOLDEN HUTCHISON gives a hug to a black bear cub—the product of a taxidermist’s skills—at the Michigan DNR’s Great Youth Jamboree. The event on Sunday marked the fourth year of the Jamboree. Additional photos are on page 12.
  • Front.crossing
    Crossing over—Jim Heiney was given a U.S. flag to carry by George Vereecke (behind Jim in the hat), turning him into the leader of the parade. Bridge Walk participants cross over Bean Creek while, in the background, members of the Morenci Legion Riders cross the main traffic bridge on East Street South. Additional photos appear on the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.hose Testing
    HOSE safety—The FireCatt hose testing company from Troy put Morenci Fire Department hose to the test Monday morning when Mill Street was closed to traffic. The company also checks nozzles and ladders for wear in an effort to keep fire fighters safe while on calls.
  • Front.starting
    BIKE-A-THON—Children in Morenci’s Summer Recreation Program brought their bikes last Tuesday to participate in a bike-a-thon. Riders await the start of the event at the elementary school before being led on a course through town by organizer Leonie Leahy.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016