• Shadow.salon
    LEARNING THE ROPES—Kristy Castillo (left), co-owner of Mane Street Salon, works with Kendal Kuhn as Sierra Orner takes a phone call. The two Morenci Area High School juniors spent Friday at the salon as part of a job shadowing experience.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.

2008.10.01 What's keeping you awake at night?

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

I could barely keep my eyes open trying to read through the results of the new sleep survey from SleepBetter.org. It wasn’t fatigue that made it a challenge, just a lot of small print.

The survey points to three reasons for poor sleep: finances, family and health. That doesn’t explain my situation. At 3:33 a.m. I was thinking about the mercury separating in my thermometer outside.

According to the survey, 47 percent of Americans cite financial concerns as anxieties that keep them awake at night. About 45 percent worry about health and lack of health insurance.

I should point out here that the survey was an on-line survey of 2,000 people. That means you have to be an internet user to have talked about your sleep problems and you had to be one of those people who would actually take the time to participate in a survey on-line about sleep.

There’s probably a good chance that it was 1 a.m. when many people took the survey because they just couldn’t force themselves to go off-line and get into bed. Little wonder they have sleep troubles.

Overall, the survey concludes that 75 percent of Americans don’t think they’re getting enough sleep and only a third rate their sleep as good or excellent.

Dr. Breus, SleepBetter’s board certified psychologist, talks about the vicious cycle: poor sleep leads to a poor work performance which leads to financial concerns (about getting canned, apparently) which leads back to more poor sleep.

There’s a hint of a solution in the final finding from the survey: 50 percent of Americans have not yet found the perfect pillow or mattress. Probably 25 percent of the world’s population doesn’t own what SleepBetter would distinguish as a mattress. I wonder how those people are sleeping.

Another solution is to take the website’s Zzzz Score test and learn from the advice offered by the doctor.

There are questions about your lack of exercise, the temperature of your feet, who you’re sleeping with, your sleeping position and the age of your pillow and mattress.

My Zzzz Score suggests using window blinds, which I have for years. My mention of cold feet triggered an alarm for Dr. Breus. This could indicate a serious medical condition and he recommends I talk to my doctor about it immediately and also get advice from my doctor about ways to increase comfort during sleep. Maybe I can get a prescription for a pair of thin socks.

Dr. Breus thinks I should consider buying a new mattress. If I like my old mattress and still find it comfortable, the doctor suggests that I could support the bedding industry in a lesser way by buying a mattress topper. Actually, we have an old mattress in need of replacing, but I’m not going to give Dr. Breus the satisfaction of knowing that.

I decided to mess with the doctor and his Zzzz Score. I signed in under a different name with some different answers. I’m told that sleeping with a pet might lead to allergies and body aches. One of us should sleep on the floor.

Even though my pillow is new, I might want to consider something specifically designed for my personal sleep style. And just because my mattress is new, he gave me something to worry about during those moments of insomnia: Some mattresses wear out in five years. I should probably buy a mattress topper or pad.

I very seldom have trouble getting to sleep. It’s the 3:33 thing when I wake up and my mind kicks into gear. I don’t consider it worrying; just thinking about things. The doctor says maybe I should make a list of my life’s current events before I go to sleep.

He says I should make my bedroom with its new mattress topper into a sanctuary and perhaps bring in the freshness of the outdoors. My wife already thinks it’s a sanctuary for spiders.

He says I should pamper myself with a massage and meditation before I use my new firm pillow. And after I see a doctor about the temperature of my feet, perhaps I should consult with a sleep specialist.

At least now I have something to worry about at 3:33 a.m.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016