The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2008.08.27 Fishing for a tale from the past

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Who has time to write a column? I was out of town for a long weekend in the north. It was the wedding of the month—this time my son, Ben, and his new wife, Sarah. It was another great one, this time overlooking Grand Traverse Bay.

So far there’s no word on Maddie’s bridesmaid pledge to follow up with a third wedding in September.

But who has time for a column, or even to make a newspaper?

Here’s an old one from 20 years ago. It’s really very appropriate because it’s about five-year-old Ben and fishing. He’s always loved it, always longed to do it, but it seems that he never catches much.

He and his groomsmen went out into Lake Michigan before the ceremony to try their luck with the salmon. They caught quite a few, but I wanted to know specifically how Ben did. What I consider his bad fishing luck was covered in this experience.

I didn’t know how it works, but there are several poles in place around the boat; not one pole per person. So when something is hooked, one member of the party steps forward to reel it in.

I guess I never got a definite answer, but I’ll assume at least one of those catches was his on his wedding weekend. It wasn’t always that good.


(From July 27, 1988)

The blame for our dinner problems Saturday night lay squarely on the shoulders of a local hardware store owner who also happens to be a neighbor.

This kind-hearted gentleman gave an old fishing tackle box to Ben recently. It wasn’t any great loss to him since he’s got about a dozen of them in his boat. And if Ben has an empty tackle box, what can he do but go down to that hardware store several times a week to buy fishing gear. It was all pretty good thinking on the part of the hardware man.

This guy took Ben and me fishing a couple of weeks age and we never got so much as a nibble. He provoked Ben to a high level of excitation with tales about Lake Hudson muskies, but we were left with nothing to do but compare who caught the longest weeds, the bushiest weeds, etc.

Ben’s life pretty much revolves around fishing now. Or at least thinking about fishing. He’s always walking around the yard with his pole, talking about digging a pond out in back.

He’s been able to afford about half a dozen plastic worms and grubs. He’s hoping for some old lures to accompany that old tackle box.

He’s financially so far away from the high price of a real muskie lure that his mind is starting to move into high gear. He showed me his tackle box last week and there was a zucchini inside. He’s going to tie a hook to it and catch a muskie with that thing.

Then came Saturday night dinner. It’s hard to believe, but there were no zucchini remaining in the garden. Colleen had to have a zucchini for Zucchini Helenique or something, but there weren’t any. I told her where to look and sure enough it was there, but Ben wouldn’t let her have it.

She took a closer look at it and decided she didn’t want the thing anyway—it had spent a few nights in the tackle box—and we had some other kind of Helenique.

That’s not the end of this fishing mania.

I know at least one car drove by our house Friday night when I stood out front holding a very strange contraption. Ben had called me out to help him do something. I walked down the steps and he thrust into my hands a broom which had a flashlight secured with a few feet of duct tape. Extending out from the end, buried under more tape, was a fly swatter.

He flipped on the flashlight and directed me to a small opening between the steps and the porch foundation. I stuck the thing in, looked around with the flashlight, and sure enough, there was a little red and white fishing bobber at the back.

I could just reach it with the swatter, but it rolled off to the side out of sight. I gave him back his tool, went inside and tried to forget about fishing.

Some people are glad Lake Hudson exists, but I’m not always so sure.

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