The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2008.07.10 As the father of the bride...

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Busy times again, so here’s an annotated version of my Father of the Bride speech that I recited Saturday night.

I’d like to welcome you all to this special day for Ben and Sarah.

Whoops. Wrong speech. Wrong child. Wrong month. [The opening joke. The wedding was for Taylor and Rosanna. My son, Ben, is getting married in August.]

To this special day for Maddie and JJ. JJ? Who’s JJ?

I can tell you who he is. To quote Maddie: “He’s nobody. He’s nothing.”

[Perhaps he really is nothing. It’s someone from her geology class in Wyoming.]

I face a couple of obstacles in giving a F.O.T.B. speech. I’m not sure what’s expected of me since I’ve gone absent at so many weddings.

One of the true pleasures of fatherhood is having young children that need removing from a wedding ceremony. Escort them outside, loosen the tie, play a little tag, it’s wonderful.

Even when Rosanna was still in high school, I would pinch her hard enough to make her cry. It was a little embarrassing to carry a sobbing teenager out of a banquet hall, but it worked.

First, a brief history.

Rozee passed by a great offer from the University of Michigan to instead attend a little school in Kentucky.

I knew it was a safe place when we dropped her off at the dorm. There was a sign posted that warned against getting horizontal with members of the opposite sex. And there was to be no straddling, either.

She wasn’t going to get in any boy trouble at this place. However, Berea’s policy on students going off on foreign study trips together might be on the liberal side. [The newlyweds, Rosanna and Taylor, traveled together for overseas studies.]

My perceptive wife remembers when this relationship began, at least from our perspective.

It takes about six hours to drive from Morenci to Berea, so we were pleased to hear that Rosanna once had a ride back to school with someone who would be in a town just west of Cleveland.

Colleen recalls that Rozee seemed a little buoyant on the trip to Cleveland. She was talking about this guy who was to give her a ride and made us listen to him singing a song that he wrote about buttocks. Maybe he’ll perform later in the evening. [Taylor said later that a friend of his was mortified that the song might actually be played.]

When we arrived at the appointed location, we were introduced to this Big Man on Campus who drove her back. [BMOC—Taylor is 6-foot-8.]

So, the courtship had begun. Taylor has visited us several times since then and we’ve had some good times together.

Then came the fateful phone call. I was at work when I received the call from Taylor. It was the southern gentleman asking for permission to marry my daughter.

Of course I thought it was preposterous, but it seemed rude to say no. It was Colleen who later yelled, “No! No!” She has no problem with Taylor. She just thought they were too young. After all, she married a 30-year-old guy when she was 24.

And that brings us to this gathering tonight. I’ve asked a few people for advice on how this talk should proceed and they tell me it should  be an emotional, heart-felt talk.

That’s not my style. Colleen could do a great job at that. She could end up sobbing on the floor while the rescue squad takes her away. For me, having kids get married is just part of the natural flow of things, like getting senile.

I mentioned earlier that I faced two obstacles. First, not knowing what to say. Second, addressing the great cultural divide.

There’s an enormous diversity of geography represented here. From the west, we have guests ranging from Alaska down through Oregon and into California. There’s someone here from Montréal and others from New York City and Joisey and North Carolina.

Minnesota and Wisconsin on the north, Arizona, Texas, Louisiana and Florida on the south. And all across the middle, from Colorado to Missouri to Kentucky. [As my father pointed out, it was like a big family reunion. Lots of fun. We counted 18 states and one province.]

There are many, many Kentuckians, and that’s where I’m concerned about communications.

Taylor recently reminded me that Morenci is the southern-most city in Michigan, but that’s probably not good enough.

I’m going to need some help and I’d like to bring Taylor’s father, Pat Ballinger, up here to do some translating for me.

[This is when I totally embarrassed myself. I’m not sure if I embarrassed myself more or Taylor’s father, but he was a good sport for going through with it. I prepared for this next segment by Googling “Kentucky sayings” and came up with a list superlatives that are allegedly spoken by Kentuckians. For example:]

When we first met Taylor, we weren’t sure what to think.

Pat: He might have been all vine and no taters.

Was he a good student?

Pat: If his brains were leather, he couldn’t saddle a fly.

He looked a little tired that day.

Pat: His eyes were like two fried eggs in a slop bucket. Maybe he sorted bobcats for a livin’.

But he had a great smile.

Pat: He could grin a coon out of a tree.

He had an easy-going way about him.

Pat: He was as slow as smoke off possum pooh.

[Yeah, I really made Pat say all that stuff. And more. Poor guy. I just hope the Kentucky guests were only moderately offended.

Anyway, the wedding was great and the reception was, too. It was enough to keep your dog from suckin’ eggs. It beat the hens wrasslin’ six ways from Sunday. And so forth.]

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016