The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Snow.2
    FIRST SNOW—Heavy, wet flakes piled deep on tree branches—and windshields—as the area received its first significant snowfall of the season. “Usually it begins with a dusting or two,” said George Isobar, Morenci’s observer for the National Weather Service, “but this time it came with a vengeance.” By the end of the day Saturday, a little over four inches of snow was on the ground. Now comes the thaw with temperatures in the 40s and 50s for three days.
  • Front.sculpt
    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
  • Front.tar.wide
    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
  • Front.pull
    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.homecoming Court
    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.
  • Front.homecoming Court
  • Cheer
  • Front.park.lights
  • Front.pull
  • Front.ropes
  • Front.sculpt
  • Front.tar.wide
  • Front.toss
  • Front.walk Across

2008.07.10 As the father of the bride...

Written by David Green.


Busy times again, so here’s an annotated version of my Father of the Bride speech that I recited Saturday night.

I’d like to welcome you all to this special day for Ben and Sarah.

Whoops. Wrong speech. Wrong child. Wrong month. [The opening joke. The wedding was for Taylor and Rosanna. My son, Ben, is getting married in August.]

To this special day for Maddie and JJ. JJ? Who’s JJ?

I can tell you who he is. To quote Maddie: “He’s nobody. He’s nothing.”

[Perhaps he really is nothing. It’s someone from her geology class in Wyoming.]

I face a couple of obstacles in giving a F.O.T.B. speech. I’m not sure what’s expected of me since I’ve gone absent at so many weddings.

One of the true pleasures of fatherhood is having young children that need removing from a wedding ceremony. Escort them outside, loosen the tie, play a little tag, it’s wonderful.

Even when Rosanna was still in high school, I would pinch her hard enough to make her cry. It was a little embarrassing to carry a sobbing teenager out of a banquet hall, but it worked.

First, a brief history.

Rozee passed by a great offer from the University of Michigan to instead attend a little school in Kentucky.

I knew it was a safe place when we dropped her off at the dorm. There was a sign posted that warned against getting horizontal with members of the opposite sex. And there was to be no straddling, either.

She wasn’t going to get in any boy trouble at this place. However, Berea’s policy on students going off on foreign study trips together might be on the liberal side. [The newlyweds, Rosanna and Taylor, traveled together for overseas studies.]

My perceptive wife remembers when this relationship began, at least from our perspective.

It takes about six hours to drive from Morenci to Berea, so we were pleased to hear that Rosanna once had a ride back to school with someone who would be in a town just west of Cleveland.

Colleen recalls that Rozee seemed a little buoyant on the trip to Cleveland. She was talking about this guy who was to give her a ride and made us listen to him singing a song that he wrote about buttocks. Maybe he’ll perform later in the evening. [Taylor said later that a friend of his was mortified that the song might actually be played.]

When we arrived at the appointed location, we were introduced to this Big Man on Campus who drove her back. [BMOC—Taylor is 6-foot-8.]

So, the courtship had begun. Taylor has visited us several times since then and we’ve had some good times together.

Then came the fateful phone call. I was at work when I received the call from Taylor. It was the southern gentleman asking for permission to marry my daughter.

Of course I thought it was preposterous, but it seemed rude to say no. It was Colleen who later yelled, “No! No!” She has no problem with Taylor. She just thought they were too young. After all, she married a 30-year-old guy when she was 24.

And that brings us to this gathering tonight. I’ve asked a few people for advice on how this talk should proceed and they tell me it should  be an emotional, heart-felt talk.

That’s not my style. Colleen could do a great job at that. She could end up sobbing on the floor while the rescue squad takes her away. For me, having kids get married is just part of the natural flow of things, like getting senile.

I mentioned earlier that I faced two obstacles. First, not knowing what to say. Second, addressing the great cultural divide.

There’s an enormous diversity of geography represented here. From the west, we have guests ranging from Alaska down through Oregon and into California. There’s someone here from Montréal and others from New York City and Joisey and North Carolina.

Minnesota and Wisconsin on the north, Arizona, Texas, Louisiana and Florida on the south. And all across the middle, from Colorado to Missouri to Kentucky. [As my father pointed out, it was like a big family reunion. Lots of fun. We counted 18 states and one province.]

There are many, many Kentuckians, and that’s where I’m concerned about communications.

Taylor recently reminded me that Morenci is the southern-most city in Michigan, but that’s probably not good enough.

I’m going to need some help and I’d like to bring Taylor’s father, Pat Ballinger, up here to do some translating for me.

[This is when I totally embarrassed myself. I’m not sure if I embarrassed myself more or Taylor’s father, but he was a good sport for going through with it. I prepared for this next segment by Googling “Kentucky sayings” and came up with a list superlatives that are allegedly spoken by Kentuckians. For example:]

When we first met Taylor, we weren’t sure what to think.

Pat: He might have been all vine and no taters.

Was he a good student?

Pat: If his brains were leather, he couldn’t saddle a fly.

He looked a little tired that day.

Pat: His eyes were like two fried eggs in a slop bucket. Maybe he sorted bobcats for a livin’.

But he had a great smile.

Pat: He could grin a coon out of a tree.

He had an easy-going way about him.

Pat: He was as slow as smoke off possum pooh.

[Yeah, I really made Pat say all that stuff. And more. Poor guy. I just hope the Kentucky guests were only moderately offended.

Anyway, the wedding was great and the reception was, too. It was enough to keep your dog from suckin’ eggs. It beat the hens wrasslin’ six ways from Sunday. And so forth.]

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2015