The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • Snow.2
    FIRST SNOW—Heavy, wet flakes piled deep on tree branches—and windshields—as the area received its first significant snowfall of the season. “Usually it begins with a dusting or two,” said George Isobar, Morenci’s observer for the National Weather Service, “but this time it came with a vengeance.” By the end of the day Saturday, a little over four inches of snow was on the ground. Now comes the thaw with temperatures in the 40s and 50s for three days.
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    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
  • Front.tar.wide
    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
  • Front.pull
    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
  • Front.ropes
    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.homecoming Court
    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.
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2008.05.14 Feeling neurotic? It's OK

Written by David Green.


The long-term forecast for this region calls for conscientious behavior with a touch of neuroticism.

What? Has the idiot finished with Lyons and now he’s going after all of us? That seems to be the case. I’m obviously a man with too much information and an inability to keep quiet.

My new information was collected by a couple of researchers who spun regional personality data into a set of five maps of the USA.

Why just five maps? Because classic psychology studies focus on five broad personality traits: Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness and Neuroticism.

It turns out there are clusters of like-minded individuals and their presence can be shown on a map.

So how are those people over in Lyons...just joking. We’re all in this together. Our shared traits tend to cover a wide swath of territory. Let’s take a close look at what’s become known as our psychogeography.

What about Agreeableness? No, that’s not us. There’s a wide river of agreeable people flowing out of Minnesota and following the Mississippi River down to the Gulf. Interesting, don’t you think? Must be some connection. In the south it spreads out wide and nearly the entire state of Georgia is the hotbed of agreeable people.

These people tend to be compassionate and cooperative rather than suspicious and antagonistic. Social harmony, an optimistic view of human nature.

We’re not characterized by an Openness to Experience, either, but that map is rather empty. Those people are clustered in southern Florida, Austin, Los Angeles and California’s Bay Area, Seattle and New York City.

The Openness people appreciate art, emotion, adventure, unusual ideas, curiosity and a variety of experience. Hmmm, is this why I sometimes feel out of place in Morenci?

Everyone has his or her unique mixture of traits. An Open person could also possess a blend of Agreeableness: the unconventional views could be tempered by conforming actions. That’s safe for a small town.

So what are we like around here? Extroverted? Energy, positive emotions, seeking stimulation—a lot of interaction with the external world.

There’s something peculiar with this map. Every personality type has to fade off somewhere and the clusters of Extroverts tapers off right around here.

A glance at the map shows density around Chicago and spreading up toward Madison. Less intense is an enormous area starting up in Minnesota and heading down through Missouri to the Gulf. Central Florida is crawling with Extroverts.

The map shows the spread moving back north right up into Michigan except for this hole which is most of Ohio. A close-up view shows the band of Extroverts skirting around Fulton and Lenawee counties.

That’s because we don’t really like drawing attention to ourselves. We’re quiet around strangers and we really don’t have a lot to say.

There are only two of the Big Five remaining. Surely we must have some common properties.

We do. We’re Conscientious and it’s a Michigan thing. A good share of the state has this personality type, but the map shows this characteristic mostly in the southeast U.S., with a finger off toward eastern Nebraska plus widespread coverage in New Mexico and Arizona.

What does this say about us? We show self-discipline and aim for achievement. We plan rather than act spontaneously. We get our chores done. We’re boring?

This leaves number five: Neuroticism. We’re far from the hotbed of the East Coast, but the second-strongest collection of neurotics is clustered in southern Ohio, from Columbus down to Cincinnati, spilling over into northern Kentucky and moving northeast into western Pennsylvania. The bottom tier of Michigan counties also favors the unstable types.

We neurotics have a tendency to experience unpleasant emotions easily—anger, depression, anxiety. We see ordinary situations as threatening and minor frustrations as hopelessly difficult.

By now, I expect that you have taken pieces of the Big Five and created your own mental puzzle to explain yourself.

And for those of you readers who were born here but no longer live in the area, now you know why you left. You just had to go off and join your own people.

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