2008.04.30 They're just not the same in 43533

Written by David Green.

[Warning: This column was found to be very offensive to at least one Lyons reader who misunderstood the lack of seriousness] 


By DAVID GREEN

What is it about those people in the 43533 Zip Code? You know who I’m talking about. It’s the people to the east from Lyons. They’re so different from us.

They’re driving GMC Sierra gas hogs to go whitewater rafting and skiing. They make more money than most of us and they’re ready to spend it.

And then there’s all those retired ones who drive to their VFW meetings in their Ford Crown Vic—if they can break away from watching Jeopardy and Wheel of Fortune.

Sound familiar? There’s more on those Lyons residents.

There are plenty of the median income types who have a Dodge Ram pickup and attend their kids’ many sporting events. Most of them own a camper, they like auto racing and they just can’t stop buying sporting equipment.

But those people are a dime a dozen. They’re not just in Lyons. Morenci, Fayette and Waldron have plenty, too, and we were talking about what makes Lyons so unique.

Lyons has this group of people that loves shopping via the internet, especially for gardening supplies. So many of them are remarried—probably used that power boat to attract a new mate—and they’re doing the home equity loan/second mortgage thing to make some big purchases.

Lyons also has those people who love traveling and collecting. There are probably more antique collectors over there than anywhere else in the area. Of course they can’t travel when they’re so busy with their home renovation projects.

The rural residents don’t spend a lot of time on-line because they can’t get high-speed internet service. So they watch Country Music TV and Outdoor Life Network via satellite and splurge on pay-per-view movies. They also look at newspaper ads, bless them.

I don’t know if any of this really hits home for Lyons. It’s only what I’m learning from the Claritas company.

“Claritas is all about giving you a clear picture of the customers you have yet to meet.” That’s the way the company describes its services.

Here’s another way: Pay them money and they’ll explain why an Applebee’s restaurant will never come to your area.

It’s all about demographics and the money residing within those demographics.

You can shell out money for a membership, but anybody can type in a Zip Code and get some basic information. You have to pay to learn what percentage of Lyons people drive Dodge Rams, but there’s a general indication of the community that you might find accurate.

When I compared Lyons, Morenci, Fayette and Waldron, I noticed there are several shared characteristics, but what really caught my attention was how unique Lyons is. Out of 15 characteristics for each community, Lyons had five that none of the others shared.

The bottom line for Claritas is that there’s more money in Lyons than in those poorer communities to the west. I could have consulted the federal census data and come up with the same numbers, I suppose, or maybe not. I keep getting different results with the Lyons Zip Code. Things must be changing rapidly over there.

The first time through there were Travel and Antiques people over there. They’ve now been replaced by Khakis and Credit (they travel by motor home and have a loan for the vehicle). There weren’t any Mayberry-ville groups over there the first time, either. They were only in Morenci. You know them: They drive Chevy Suburbans, hunt with a gun, subscribe to Bassmaster magazine, listen to country music and eat at a steak house.

Fayette is the only community with Finance Chargers (raising kids and ordering from priceline.com) and with Bedrock America (Silverado, baby magazines, professional wrestling and mobile homes).

Only Waldron has the Young and Rustic (Dodge Neon, auto racing, King of the Hill) and Morenci was unique with Active Empty Nesters (camping, country music and second mortgages).

I don’t know how accurately Claritas knows us, but when a friend showed me the website I typed in Morenci’s Zip Code, I saw the Shotguns & Pickups category and read the words “Dodge Ram.” I looked across the street and there it was. The radio was probably set to country.

  • Front.batter
    THE DERBY—Tyler “Smallpox” Flakne of Minnesota’s Home Run League All-Stars goes for the fence Friday night during the National Wiffle League Association’s home run derby in Morenci. This year the wiffleball national tournament moved from Dublin, Ohio, to Morenci’s Wakefield Park. During the derby, competitors had two minutes to hit as many home runs as possible. The winner this year finished with 21. See page 6 and 7 for additional photos.
  • Front.green Screen
    OUT OF THIS WORLD—Elizabeth McFadden and Elise Christle pose in front of the green screen as VolunTeen Noah Gilson makes them appear as though they are standing on the Moon. More photos from the Stair District Library’s NASA @ My Library program are on page 12.
  • Front.snake
    Lannis Smith of the Leslie Science and Nature Center in Ann Arbor shows off a python last week at Stair District Library's Summer Reading Program.
  • Front.fireworks
    FIREWORKS erupt Saturday night over Morenci’s Wakefield Park during the waning hours of the Town and Country Festival. Additional festival photos are inside.
  • Pipeline Spread
    LINED UP—Lengths of pipe were put in place last week along the route of the Rover natural gas pipeline that will stretch from Defiance, Ohio, to Ontario, Canada. Topsoil was removed before the pipes were laid out. The 42-inch diameter pipeline is scheduled for completion in November.
  • Front.F.school
    PROGRESS continues on the agriculture classroom addition at Fayette High School. The project will add 2,900 square feet of space and include an overhead door that would allow equipment to be driven inside. The building should be ready for the start of school in August. Work on ball fields and a running track is also underway.
  • Front.rock Study
    ROCKHOUNDS—From the left, Joseph McCullough, Sean Pagett and Jonathan McCullough peer through hand lenses to study rocks. The project is part of Morenci Elementary School’s summer camp that continues into August.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2017