2008.04.02 New generation of couch sitters

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

This morning I read an interview in the on-line magazine Salon with Pamela Paul, the author of “Parenting, Inc.,” a book critical of the growth industry of modern parenting.

The introduction to the article says the market for baby products and services “has ballooned like a giant inflatable bounce house” in recent years.

There’s the amazing Miracle Blanket and the Kiddopotamus SwaddleMe for squirmy infants. There’s the Halo SleepSack Wearable Blanket to prevent inadvertent suffocation, showing that something as simple as the baby blanket is no longer sufficient.

There’s a large array of infant sleep symmetry systems to prevent baby from slumbering in any position but its back. One of these comes with a complimentary “Sounds of the Womb” CD.

Baby monitors costing well over $100 now feature zero-interference technology, taking the fun out of listening to neighbors on their CB radios. CB radios? They’re still around?

A link in the article took me to Amazon.com where page after page after page of baby products are listed. I noticed that diapers are among the leading sellers—this from what was once a book-selling company—and I wonder about the future of America when small-town stores are no longer needed.

Comments about the article are numerous. I suppose the overall tone is one of agreement, but.… In other words, yes, so many of these products are unnecessary, but the baby sign language really helped us, or the fancy swaddling blanket really worked like a charm or the Bugaboo stroller was essential for living in the city where we had to walk everywhere, up and down curbs, into the subway, off to the laundry, etc.

The $800 Bugaboo stroller. Now there’s a hot topic of discussion. It’s not even top of the line anymore. Thousand dollar models are available and, according to the author, the cheaper brands have seen the light and raised their prices.

There’s a lot of discussion about items that are new since I had babies around, such as the Baby Einstein device which I’m still trying to figure out. Baby’s own DVD player? I’ve seen it described as the hottest toy ever to feed off “the status anxiety of neurotic parents.”

The timeline of success on the company website starts off with a child contently playing with colored rings, then moves forward into the story of the multi-million dollar business acquired by Disney. What a sad progression from baby playing with toys to baby watching its own mini-television.

But wait. Other mothers chime in saying not to look at it as producing a young Einstein. It simply fits in perfectly with the essential needs of the day—mother has to take a shower, make dinner, etc. And baby is entertained. Ah, there’s the difference—entertained rather than playing and exploring.

Pamela Paul says that honest marketing would have named Baby Einstein “Couch Potato Kiddie” and urged parents to “Get your child started on the joys of watching television as early as possible.”

Paul comes up with a statistic that says the average child acquires 70 new toys a year. She would like to see more reusing.

One reader jokes about marketing “The REAL Baby Einstein.” She would package wooden spoons, a few pot lids, some yarn, wooden blocks, etc. The stuff that Einstein probably played with, she says.

Another suggests putting away the high-tech toys and just getting down on the floor and playing with baby. Crawl around, play peek-a-boo, read a book—and don’t worry about the mess.

It takes a strong stomach to step off the must-have merry-go-round, says one mother, because other parents will be watching and criticizing.

I think about the cardboard boxes, the red wagon, the colored blocks, crayons and paints—all those simple toys that my kids enjoyed in their younger years—and I wonder what will happen when they have their own kids.

Will they make up for their “deprived” childhood and load up on what the marketers are pushing, or will they think back to their simpler toddler days and choose to repeat it?

I like what this one mother wrote: “Finally we realized that all our kids really needed was us. You are the best thing your kids can have.”

  • Front.pokemon
    LATEST CRAZE—David Cortes (left) and Ty Kruse, along with Jerred Heselschwerdt (standing), consult their smartphones while engaging in the game of Pokémon Go. The virtual scavenger hunt comes to life when players are in the vicinity of gyms, such as Stair District Library, and PokéStops such as the fire station across the street. The boys had spent time Monday morning searching for Pokémon at Wakefield Park.
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    on your mark, get set, drum!—Drew Joughin (black shirt), Maddox Joughin and Kaleea Braun took the front row last week when Angela Rettle and assistants led the Stair District Library Summer Reading Program kids in a session of cardio drumming. The sports and healthy living theme continued yesterday with a Mini Jamboree at Lake Hudson State Park arranged by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Next week’s program features the Flying Aces Frisbee show.
  • Girls.on.ride
    NADIYA YORK and Aniston Valentine take a spin on the Casino, one of the rides offered at Wakefield Park during Morenci’s Town and Country Festival. This year’s festival remained dry but with plenty of heat during the three-day run. Additional photographs are inside this week’s Observer.
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    Angela Davis (2) and teammate Allison VanBrandt break into a jig after Morenci's softball team won its third consecutive regional title.
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    ART PARK—A design created by Poggemeyer Design Group shows a “pocket art park” in the green space south of the State Line Observer building. The proposal includes a 12-foot sculpture based on a design created by Morenci sixth grade student Klara Wesley through a school and library collaboration. A wooden band shell is located at the back of the lot. The Observer wall would be covered with a synthetic stucco material. City council members are considering ways to fund the estimated $125,000 project and perhaps tackling construction one step at a time.
  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.soccer.balls
    BEVY OF BALLS—Stair District Library Summer Reading Program VolunTeens, including Libby Rorick, back left and Ty Kruse, back right, threw a dozen inflatable soccer balls into the crowd during a reading of “Sergio Saves the Game.” The sports-themed program continues on Wednesdays through July 27.
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  • Shadow.salon

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