The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

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    FIRST SNOW—Heavy, wet flakes piled deep on tree branches—and windshields—as the area received its first significant snowfall of the season. “Usually it begins with a dusting or two,” said George Isobar, Morenci’s observer for the National Weather Service, “but this time it came with a vengeance.” By the end of the day Saturday, a little over four inches of snow was on the ground. Now comes the thaw with temperatures in the 40s and 50s for three days.
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    SKEWERS, gumdrops, and marshmallows are all that’s needed to create interesting shapes and designs for Layla McDowell Saturday at Stair District Library’s “Sculptamania!” Open House. The program featuring design games and materials is one part of a larger project funded by a $7,500 Curiosity Creates grant from Disney and the American Library Association. Additional photos are on page 7.
    Morenci marching band members took to the field Friday night dressed for Halloween during the Bulldog’s first playoff game. Morenci fans had a bit of a scare until the fourth quarter when the Bulldogs scored 30 points to leave Lenawee Christian School behind. Whiteford visits Morenci this Friday for the district championship game. From the left is Clayton Borton, Morgan Merillat and James O’Brien.
    DNA PUZZLE—Mitchell Storrs and Wyatt Mohr tackle a puzzle representing the structure of DNA. There’s only one correct way for all the pieces to fit. It’s one of the new materials that can be used in both biology and chemistry classes, said teacher Loretta Cox.
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    A TRAFFIC control worker stands in the middle of Morenci’s Main Street Tuesday morning, waiting for the next flow of vehicles to be let through from the west. The dusty gravel surface was sealed with a layer of tar, leaving only the application of paint for new striping. The project was completed in conjunction with county road commission work west of Morenci.
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    JUNIORS Jazmin Smith and Trevor Corkle struggle against a team from the sophomore class Friday during the annual tug of war at the Homecoming Games pep rally. Even the seniors struggled against the sophomores who won the competition. At the main course of the day, the Bulldog football team struggled against Whiteford in a homecoming loss.
    YOUNG soccer players surived a chilly morning Saturday in Morenci’s PTO league. From the left is Emma Cordts, Wayne Corser, Carter and Levi Seitz, Briella York and Drew Joughin. Two more weeks of soccer remain for this season.
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    BOWEN BAUMGARTNER of Morenci makes his way across a rope bridge constructed by the Tecumseh Boy Scout troop Sunday at Lake Hudson Recreation Area. The bridge was one of many challenges, displays and games set up for the annual Youth Jamboree by the Michigan DNR. Additional photos on are the back page of this week’s Observer.
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    One of four senior candidates will be crowned the fall homecoming queen during half-time of this week’s Morenci-Whiteford football game. In the back row (left to right) is exchange student Kinga Vidor (her escort will be Caylob Alcock), seniors Alli VanBrandt (escorted by Sam Cool), Larissa Elliott (escorted by Clayton Borton), Samantha Wright (escorted by JJ Elarton) and Justis McCowan (escorted by Austin Gilson), and exchange student Rebecca Rosenberger (escorted by Garrett Smith). Front row freshman court member Allie Kaiser (escorted by Anthony Thomas), sophomore Marlee Blaker (escorted by Nate Elarton) and junior Cheyenne Stone (escorted by Dominick Sell).
  • Front.park.lights
    GETTING READY—Jerad Gleckler pounds nails to secure a string of holiday lights on the side of the Wakefield Park concession stand while other members of the Volunteer Club and others hold them in place. The volunteers showed up Sunday afternoon to string lights at the park. The decorating project will continue this Sunday. Denise Walsh is in charge of the effort this year.
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2008.03.26 I made it back home

Written by David Green.


The movie “Into the Wild” begins with these words by Lord Byron:

“There is a pleasure in the pathless woods,

There is a rapture on the lonely shore,

There is society, where none intrudes,

By the deep Sea, and music in its roar;

I love not Man the less, but Nature more.”

Byron’s poem is the perfect introduction for two reasons. His poem describes the adventures and thoughts of a world-weary young man who is disillusioned with a life of pleasure and partying.

And that describes a 24-year-old boy named Christopher McCandless who hit the road after college, never to return. He called himself Alexander Supertramp and he had one goal in mind: To lose himself in the back country of Alaska. When he sent out his last postcard to a friend, he wrote, “Now I walk into the wild.”laddertonowhere.jpg

McCandless’s story is a fascinating one. He was a friendly, intelligent kid who suddenly left his family and friends behind to strike out on his own.

There’s an odd twist to his wanderlust: He never spoke to his family again, not even to his sister that he was so close to. Not a phone call, not a letter, nothing.

Anti-social doesn’t seem like an apt description. He spent a lot of time alone, but he made some very good friends on his travels. As presented in the movie, he deeply touched a lot of lives before once again shouldering his backpack and moving on down the road.

The McCandless tale appeals to a large audience. Both the movie and Jon Krakauer’s book are highly acclaimed. But there’s a segment of the audience who makes a different connection. We also were once out on the road with thumb extended.

Most of us, I think, didn’t follow the same route—we called home occasionally—and we didn’t break away so completely.

McCandless hiked for miles into the Alaskan wilderness before settling down to live inside an old school bus left behind by construction workers. He wasn’t fully prepared for the challenge, but he was exhilarated. He was living life to its fullest, in his own odd way.

I remember a week on an island in Lake Michigan. The first weekend was spent with four other people who went home Sunday afternoon. I was left alone for the remainder of the time.

The sudden shock of solitude hit hard at first, but soon I was living that exhilarating experience, despite setbacks. McCandless’s meat rotted with maggots; my bread quickly turned moldy.

When McCandless was ready to leave and return to civilization, his departure was blocked by a raging river. For me, I  simply took the ferry back to the mainland and hitched home. Over and over, my experiences were all very tame compared to his.

There’s a much bigger difference between his adventures and my travels: I came back home.

McCandless wrote, “no longer to be poisoned by civilization he flees.” But before his four-month journey ended, he was poisoned by the wilderness. According to his journal, he ate an inedible plant, became sick and eventually died of starvation, about three weeks before some hikers found his body.

I’ve read descriptions of Christopher McCandless that call him foolish, arrogant and selfish.

After his father learned of his son’s death, he asked, “How could a kid with so much compassion cause his parents so much pain?”

Some say he had a death wish—why else would a kid walk into the wild so unprepared? I don’t know. Naòve, perhaps. Certainly lacking caution. Too strong a dose of youthful invincibility. Climbing a ladder to nowhere like I’m doing in this old photo from the 1970s.

Like many people, he really didn’t hate Man, as Byron wrote, he just liked Nature more.

Many thinkers have written about the need to share happiness, and McCandless wrote in his journal near the end, “Happiness is only real when shared.”

Maybe that’s why I came home.

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