The Weekly Newspaper serving the citizens of Morenci, Mich., Fayette, Ohio, and surrounding areas.

  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.carry.casket
    CARRYING—Riley Terry (blue jacket) and Mason Vaughn lead the way, carrying an empty casket outside to the hearse waiting at the curb. Morenci juniors and seniors visited Eagle Funeral Home last week to learn about the role of a funeral director and to understand the process of arranging for a funeral.
  • Front.lift
    MORENCI student Dalton McCowan puts everything into a dead lift attempt Saturday morning during the Wyseguy Push/Pull event. Lifters helped raise more than $1,600 for the family of the late Devin Wyse, a former Morenci power-lifter who graduated last year. Commemorative T-shirts are still available by contacting teacher Dan Hoffman.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.office
    NEW OFFICES—Fayette village administrator Steve Blue speaks with tax administrator Genna Biddix at the new front desk of the village office. Village council members voted to use budgeted renovation funds targeted for the old office and instead buy the vacant bank building on the corner of Main and Fayette streets. The old office was sold to Sherwood State Bank. When everything is put into place in the spacious new village office, an open house will be scheduled. Council member David Wheeler donated all of his time needed to make changes in the bank interior to fit the Village’s needs.

2008.02.20 Not much has changed

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

We traveled to East Lansing Saturday to visit some old friends. We, of course, is just Colleen and me, which still seems a little strange.

It was especially odd for this trip because Jim and Nancy have four children and those kids have had some good times with our three.

But that was so many years ago. We haven’t gotten together for a visit since the oldest of the kids were in elementary school. Milwaukee just hasn’t been on our meager travel agenda for a long time, and as is the case with most of the world, Morenci is rarely a vacation destination.

We met Saturday at Michigan State University, where we all went to college, but we can’t really be described as college friends. Colleen was still in high school when Jim, Nancy and I were at MSU. And besides, the three of us rarely saw one another at college. We were only summer friends.

Nancy’s father, a pastor, had connections to the Methodist summer colony of Bay View, on the north edge of Petoskey. I think the family owned one of those great old cottages in Bay View.

Nancy worked her college summers at an old hotel there, the Terrace Inn. I served as the dishwasher and general goof-off at the Terrace Inn for two college summers.

Jim was in Bay View, too. He and Nancy were high school sweethearts from Marquette and even got to spend their summers together. Jim had a summer job with the post office and it seems as though he did some work at the hotel on occasion. Maybe he filled in sometimes for old Earl, the night watchman.

There are a lot of questions to ask about those years to fill in the historical record, but we didn’t review this portion of our past. Colleen wasn’t part of it anyway. We pretty much stuck with the past 15 or so years since we last got together.

Jobs, what the kids are up to, how we failed our kids, ideas for the future, etc.—nearly six hours straight of catching up.

Jim and Nancy were on campus to visit their daughter and deliver her boyfriend for a weekend visit. The kids did the obligatory visiting with the old folks, but I could tell that was going to get old really fast.

They’d probably heard enough from the  graduates of 35 years ago saying things like, “But wasn’t there a building over there that’s no longer standing?” and “Did you ever have any classes in that hall over there?” and “Have you had a chance to view the world’s largest hair ball ever taken from the stomach of a cow?”

So the youngsters ditched us and we sat down to talk for the remaining five hours. It was rapid and non-stop, with constant derailments into related topics. Sometimes we came back to the original conversation; more likely it was left hanging as we rushed on to something else. There was a lot of ground to cover.

Jim and Nancy had a better understanding of what our kids have been doing—their lives are somewhat public via this newspaper—but we needed to hear a lot of stories about their clan.

They have four remarkable kids who haven’t always had smooth sailing in their young lives. John was of the most interest to me because we have some similar experiences.

He bicycled down to New Orleans and bummed around for a while. Currently he’s in Syria or Egypt or somewhere. Jim and Nancy haven’t heard from him in a few days and they’re a little concerned.

Jon was traveling around Europe, but then Jim made the remark one day that he and Nancy had never made it to Morocco back when they traveled Europe. The next time they heard from Jon—or maybe heard about him from another sibling—he was in Casablanca or somewhere. He rented a bicycle and rode out into the desert for a day, and now he’s off on another adventure—somewhere.

It made me think back to my traveling days and how seldom I updated my parents about my whereabouts.

Our conversation Saturday ranged from the mundane to Jim’s mention that he still questions the existence of God despite his active membership in a church. We were far from finished, but all too soon we ran out of time.

Aside from gray hair, everything seemed the same. The 15-year absence didn’t really mean a thing, and that was all very comforting.

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