2006.04.12 They went to NYC, I got antibiotics

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

I wanted to tell you about my train trip this week, but that will have to wait until I actually take a train trip—if that ever happens.

Two spring breaks ago, I rode the Greyhound to meet up with my traveling family in Kentucky. They had been in the south and were on their way back to Michigan. Daughter Rozee was still a prospective student at Berea College and we met to check it out.

The most startling thing I discovered about bus travel is that a ticket is no guarantee of a seat. You could buy your ticket in advance, show up at the station to board, and discover there was no seat available. I think there were three empty seats when I boarded, and I was almost forced to spend a few hours in the Toledo station waiting for the next bus, which also could have been full.

The Amtrak website makes it sound as though your ticket is a seat reservation. And besides, how many people travel by train these days? Maybe there are more than I think, but I doubt it. I’ll have to stand close to the tracks in Wauseon sometime and watch it go through.

Of course I wouldn’t be watching my train, the Lake Shore Limited, because it passes through Wauseon after midnight. I was to board at 1:30 a.m. and spend the next 14 hours looking out the window—so much good entertainment at only five bucks an hour.

The trip from Toledo to New York City is actually billed as taking about 13 hours and 35 minutes, but there is some fine print attached: Delays may occur on this train due to freight railroad congestion, track work or other operating conditions.

I didn’t care. I really looked forward to the grueling trip. It’s just something I wanted to experience. And besides, I learned in that terrorism manual that I wrote about recently that my chances of dying on a passenger train were one in 70 million—even better than that of dying from anthrax poisoning (one in 56 million).

But then I got sick. I acquired the respiratory thing that so many others have had, but I wasn’t shaking it off. I suppose I wasn’t doing what so many others do: rest. The train ride followed by frolic in the city didn’t seem like a wise choice.

Getting stuck at home wasn’t so bad. I heard reports of cold weather and rain in NYC, and they were visiting some places that wouldn’t have been high on my list.

But when I came home for lunch on Friday, there was a message on the answering machine. The travelers wanted me to consult the latest New Yorker magazine for gallery ideas.

Hmm, now they were doing exactly what’s high on my list for New York.

There’s always something interesting at the established museums. A retrospective of Edvard Munch, the artist who painted “The Scream.” The steel sculptures made by David Smith who worked as a welder at the Studebaker company. A recreation of Charles Darwin’s study, plus fossils he collected and live specimens of the animals he encountered on the Galápagos Islands.

It’s doubtful we would have made it to any of those, but we would have squeezed in a couple of hours for some small galleries. This is where you see the stuff that makes people say, “You call that art?”

At the Bonakdar Gallery in Chelsea, we could have watched videos showing young Turkish amateurs singing karaoke versions of songs from the Smiths album “The World Won’t Listen.”

A block away, at the PaceWildenstein, an artist carpeted the floor with an undulating landscape of thousands of plastic cups. She also used cups to create an Arctic landscape in which the “shimmering white expanse exerts a charm well beyond the sum of its repeating parts.”

Nearby were lawn chairs turned into giant whale skeletons, Nike sneakers reconfigured into Pacific Northwest aboriginal masks, and much more.

I could look at that stuff all day, and in fact we have spent what the others might describe as too much of the day going from one weirdness to another.

Now, as I’m awaiting the travelers’ return, I’m thinking about what I missed, sitting here with my antibiotics. I can only take comfort in knowing that nothing in the city this past week could ever match what we saw a few years ago: a very authentic-looking bird skeleton constructed from fingernail clippings. It just doesn’t get any better than that.

  • Front.train
    WRECKAGE—Morenci Fire Department member Taylor Schisler walks past the smoking wreckage of a semi-truck tractor on the north side of the Norfolk and Southern Railroad tracks on Ranger Highway. The truck trailer was on the south side of the tracks
  • Front.sculpta
    SCULPTORS—Morenci third grade students Emersyn Thompson (left) and Marissa Lawrence turn spaghetti sticks into mini sculptures Friday during a class visit to Stair District Library. All Morenci Elementary School classes recently visited the library to experience the creative construction toys purchased through the “Sculptamania!” project, funded by a Disney Curiosity Creates grant. The grant is administered by the Association for Library Services to Children, a division of the American Library Association.
  • Funcolor
    LEONIE LEAHY was one of three local hair stylists who volunteered time Friday at the Morenci PTO Fun Night. Her customer, Aubrey Sandusky, looks up at her mother while her hair takes on a perfect match to her outfit. Leahy said she had a great time at the event—nothing but happy clients.
  • Shadow.salon
    LEARNING THE ROPES—Kristy Castillo (left), co-owner of Mane Street Salon, works with Kendal Kuhn as Sierra Orner takes a phone call. The two Morenci Area High School juniors spent Friday at the salon as part of a job shadowing experience.
  • KayseInField
    IN THE FIELD—2004 Morenci graduate Kayse Onweller works in a test plot of wheat in Texas. She’s part of Bayer CropScience’s North American wheat breeding program based in Nebraska, where she completed post-graduate work in plant breeding and genetics.
  • Front.winner
    REFEREE Camden Miller raises the hand of Morenci Jr. Dawgs wrestler Ryder Ryan as his opponent leaves the mat in disappointment. Morenci’s youth wrestling program served as host for a tournament Saturday morning to raise money for the club. Additional photos are on the back page.
  • Front.bank.2
    SHERWOOD STATE Bank opened its Fayette office at a grand opening Friday morning, drawing a large crowd to view the renovated building. Above, Burt Blue talks to teller Cindy Funk, while his wife, Jackie, looks around the new office. The Blues missed the opening and took a quick tour on Tuesday. Few traces remain of the former grocery store and theater, however, part of the original brick wall still shows in the hallway leading to the back of the building. The drive-through window should be ready for customers later in the month.
  • Front.make.three
    FROM THE LEFT, Landon Wilkins, Ryan White and Logan Blaker try out their artistic skills Saturday afternoon at the Morenci PTO’s first Date to Create event. More than 50 people showed up to create decorated planks of wood to hang from rope. The event served as a fund-raiser for miscellaneous PTO projects. Additional photos are on the back of this week’s Observer.

Weekly newspaper serving SE Michigan and NW Ohio - State Line Observer ©2006-2016