2008.01.09 Scars tell tales

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

I’ll rate my current level of junk e-mail as moderate. It’s certainly been worse, but it could be a lot better.

I had an invitation to buy tickets to Morey’s Piers at holiday sale prices. I have no idea what is it or where it is, but it doesn’t matter since the sale expired the day before the mail arrived.

I was almost caught by an ad for a New Toilet Brush that Sterilizes as It Cleans!, but it remains unread.

I’ve been invited to join the thousands of other Americans who are investing in Costa Rican property...and profiting substantially.

Of course there are credit and financing offers, free video consoles, free gift cards, a Ped Egg at half price, cheap drugs, cheap supplements. All of that was just from the last couple of days. Maybe it’s a High Moderate junk mail rating.

This stuff is just an annoyance, a quick click of the “delete” button. I don’t read it, except for the rare moment of intrigue, such as the offer for ReJuveness Silicone Sheeting and ReJuveness Hyper-Heal Cream. The company is the leader in scar management.

I was interested in the concept, not in the act of managing my scars. I subscribe to the belief that scars tell part of the story of your life. It’s not always a good story, but it’s an interesting one. It seems like a shame to get rid of them.

I think many of mine have done some self-management over the years. They don’t show up like they once did.

I suppose if I looked closely, I could still see the mark under my lower lip where my bicycle handlebar went through. You’re supposed to have handlebar grips to prevent that sort of thing, but remember how they get worn out and the ends start to crack and eventually flips downward baring the metal edge of the handlebars? That’s what happened to my bike.

I was pedaling with the Bryner boys and we decided to head for the Morenci airport. The area in the front wasn’t mowed and the grass was at least knee high. I rode through it, hit a hidden five-gallon bucket and handlebar went through skin. Janice Bryner put on a colorful bandage that had pictures of little aircraft carriers and away we went to Devils Lake.

My oldest known scar is in one of my eyebrows. We had a glass-top coffee table in the house on East Street and somehow I broke it and a piece of glass cut me just above the eye. Lucky one there.

There are still traces of the curved scar on my left hand. It matches the shape of a bicycle fender, probably Bob Ackland’s. I had my hand on his tire and he backed up a little, drawing my hand in against the sharp edge of the fender.

Somewhere around my front hairline is a fading mark where I was hit by a rock out in the alley behind our Cawley Road house. Rainy day, we were building dams to stop the water from flowing down to North Street and someone threw a rock my way.

Down around the right ankle is a scar from messing around in the pond on Mulberry Road, just west of M-156. Carl Nachtrieb and I were out there after tadpoles. Instead a found a piece of jagged glass.

These were all childhood incidents. I must have gone years and years without scarring as I let my children take over.

There’s one exception. It’s my most recent scar. Tuesday night at the Observer is when the papers are labeled and bundled with string. I work fast because I want to end the long workday and the scissors are flying.

I think this was the first night of work for my current assistant, Zach Phillips. The poor kid. New on the job and the boss cuts a little too close to his finger and snips it open. A bloody mess.

I mentioned scars to my wife last night who started to talk about a bathtub incident. Great, I said, I can use it for my column.

“No,” she answered, “this is my material.”

And then she started in, “We used to soap up the bathtub.…”

“Stop! I don’t want to hear it. If I can’t use it, just shut up.”

“And there was this ceramic soap dish...”

I plugged my ears and started singing “la, la, la”, but I can’t get her story out of my head. I need ReJuveness Mental-Heal: Wipes scars from memory.

  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Station.2
    STRANGE STUFF—Morenci Elementary School students learn that blue isn’t really blue when seen through the right color of lens. Volunteer April Pike presents the lesson to students at one of the many stations brought to the school by the COSI science center. The theme of this year’s visit was the solar system.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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