2007.11.14 Right down to the Wire

Written by David Green.


Blame it on the Rex Theatre. That’s what got me to watch a movie in Toledo this weekend.

It went like this: I received my weekly e-mail from the Rex owners, Carolin and Mike Gregerson, telling me that “Dan In Real Life” would be showing. I mentioned that to my wife who really wanted to see the movie.

Later came a call from the Gregersons explaining that Dan had a very limited release and a little guy theatre like the Rex would not be a part of the release. Darn, that could have served as my birthday movie.

That’s not something I do every year, but it seems that most of married life has included a birthday movie. This goes back to the days before television—in my house, that is, I’m not that old—when a chance to take in a movie away from the kids was rare.

Usually my birthday movie wish was to see some oddball flick that wasn’t available for rental in Morenci or wasn’t showing in a “normal” theatre in Toledo. It meant a trip to Ann Arbor or East Lansing.

To tell you the truth, I wasn’t even thinking of a birthday movie this year. My cousin-out-law Ralph talked me into watching “The Wire,” an HBO series from a few years back, and I’m hooked.

Warning: This isn’t a show for everyone. While watching about half of the first season, I think I’ve heard the recitation of the infamous F-word more than in all the movies I’ve watched in my life combined. There was one scene of two detectives looking for clues at a murder scene in which the entire dialogue was that word. That was their conversation.

But it’s a very well done series and even my wife is addicted. She doesn’t go for movies with murders and drug abuse, but that’s changed now. She wouldn’t say that she’s addicted to “The Wire.” She’s seen too much heroin in every episode. “It’s very absorbing,” she says.

I could have easily stayed at home Friday night for another episode of “The Wire” during this blessed ’tween seasons sports break. But Colleen got into her head the idea that I wanted to go to Toledo to watch “Dan” and that I wanted to go out to dinner first. This is when the night became known as “What Colleen wants to do for my birthday.”

We decided to eat at an Indian restaurant that we’ve only seen in passing. We soon discovered the restaurant we thought existed was in fact an Indian food store. Dry lentils and curry powder wouldn’t do.

Down the street was a Chipotle Mexican Grill. That’s a chain I’ve read about recently since it’s making waves in the restaurant industry. It’s known as the largest restaurant buyer of naturally raised meats. “Food with integrity,” they say.

It was good stuff. Limited menu, making for an easy selection. Nice taste. Nice price. Quite a fistful of food. A good time was had by all.

On to Colleen’s movie. I haven’t been in a Toledo theatre in...it seems like a couple of years or more. I don’t get out much anymore, apparently.  Maybe it’s the $10 ticket price that keeps me away.

Colleen found it very enjoyable to view the large screen rather than a television screen. I suppose, but I’m content even to watch a rented DVD on a computer screen. I would say the best part was the metal railing in front of the seats. A perfect foot rest. We don’t have a railing at home.

As for the movie, it’s a winner. It’s funny, it’s sad, it shows some interesting rocks on the Rhode Island coast.

I hope the Rex gets its turn with “Dan” sometime soon. I’ll be there, unless, of course, The Wire gets in the way. OK, I admit it: We returned from “Dan” and watched some “Wire.”

My cousin said the language has adversely affected their private talk at home. There’s more than that seeping in.

When I got into the shower this morning, I thought I heard someone banging on the front door. I began wondering if they would barge right in.

Through the steamed glass I noticed the bathroom door was open a couple of inches. Did I leave it that way? I take a peek out and see nothing.

I look again through the steam and it appears to be open even farther. You should have heard what I said under my breath.

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