2007.07.15 A long weekend in Kentucky

Written by David Green.

By DAVID GREEN

Where did I go wrong? I just returned from my summer vacation (four days) and I’m wondering how I can possibly make a newspaper in a day and a half.

I have no photos. I’ve written only one news story. The city council agenda looks pretty weak, news-wise. I might have to dig into my secret folder to pull out an emergency feature story that I’ve saved just for an occasion such as this.

But only four days of vacation? OK, so I took a little time in the spring to visit my son and I’d really like to get up north for at least a weekend. How can a person go an entire year without staring at Lake Michigan for a while?

I ask where I went wrong because I read today that George Bush has averaged 62 days a year off the job since he was elected president. He’s trailing Ronald Reagan 436-418 in total days off and he has 528 days remaining in office. That’s a long time. That’s a lot more vacation yet to come.

So I took a short vacation, but it was surprisingly good. It was satisfying beyond expectations. That’s saying a lot since it was all centered around a wedding—an event I typically don’t mind avoiding. I do recall saying to my wife at one point, “If we still had young kids, I wouldn’t be here anymore.”

I think that comment was made during a lull in the action following the reception meal. We were abandoned at our table, we didn’t feel like going off visiting with strangers, and it was past my bedtime.

I remembered years past when we seemed to almost always take our kids along to events and at some point they would get bored or tired or loud and I would have to leave the scene with then, darn it. I missed many exchanging of the rings because I was out wandering around the church yard to provide child care.

This wedding was no church service. Everything took place in the wilds of Kentucky, at Cumberland Falls State Park. The ceremony itself was a public affair. The invited guests sat in chairs, but any visitor to the falls at that moment could stop and watch, and several of them did.

It’s such a great area of the country. I mentioned the need earlier to stare at a big lake. I’ll take the big rocks of that area as a substitute.

As usual, we allowed geocaching to take to interesting places. I looked up some hidden caches on the geocaching website before we left, then the four of us (the two daughters were alone) headed out to search on Friday.

First came the immense natural arch. Incredible beauty. We didn’t find the cache, but it didn’t matter with the big rock to look at.

Next we went in search of a particular creek, but the road signs didn’t match the map book and we finally ended up driving down a long, winding single-lane trail that ended up in someone’s back yard.

The dogs were going crazy with excitement. There was a large display of stuffed animal heads along the back porch. The owner was just emerging from the house when Rozee shoved the gear into reverse.

We were being a little scared Yankee about the whole situation—it probably would have been a very interesting encounter with a very friendly guy—but off we went back to the park and a close look at the falls.

The three women rode the Mist of the Cumberland or some such name—the rubber raft Kentucky version of the Niagra Falls cruise. I went in search of a geocache and was stymied again.

The next day we went in search of Buzzard Rock. Down a long, long road with no houses for miles. A half-mile walk into a woods. Thoughts of the movie “Deliverance.” There we go again, acting like we’re from some other country.

Eventually the trailed narrowed to a path and it suddenly opened to most incredible view, standing on high rocks overlooking a river far below, with buzzard waiting for our fall. Maybe I don’t need Lake Michigan this summer. Maybe I’m all set with natural beauty.

By noon Sunday we were headed back north, past a man on his porch getting a haircut, past the tobacco fields, heading back to where an unwritten newspaper awaited me.

It was strange to drive back into Morenci again—it always is when you go from here to there in one day—but it didn’t seem too short of a trip. It felt just right, and what more could you want from a little vacation?

  • Front.geese
    ON THE MOVE—Six goslings head out on manuevers with their parents in an area lake. Baby waterfowl are showing up in lakes and ponds throughout the area.
  • Front.little Ball
    Fayette's Demetrious Whiteside (left)Skylar Lester attempt to keep the ball from going out of bounds during Morenci's recent basketball tournament for fourth and fifth grade teams. Morenci's Andrew Schmidt stands by.
  • Front.tug
    MORENCI pep rallies generally end with a tug of war. The senior class entry, shown above, did not advance to the finals. Griffin Grieder, Alaina Webster, Kyle Long and Jazmin Smith are shown at the front of the rope, giving it their best effort.
  • Accident
    FAYETTE resident Patricia Stambaugh, 64, was declared dead on the scene of a single-vehicle accident Friday morning south of Morenci. Rescue units were called around 9 a.m., but as of Tuesday, law enforcement officers had not yet determined the time of the accident. According to Ohio State Highway Patrol, Stambaugh was driving west on U.S. 20 when her Chevrolet Malibu traveled off the north side of the road and down a steep embankment, coming to rest in Bean Creek (Tiffin River).
  • Athletic Fields
    SPORTS COMPLEX—Fayette’s outdoor athletic facilities will include three ball fields for summer recreation leagues at the southwest corner of the school. The baseball and softball fields, along with the running track, will be constructed on the east side of the school. Outdoor athletic fields were not part of the new school project from 2007, but voters approved a $1.4 million levy for a school addition and the sports fields last August. Both projects are scheduled to be complete by July 20.
  • Front.teacher Leading
    PRESCHOOL MUSIC—Fayette band director Jeffrey Dunford spends the last half hour of the day leading the full-day preschool class in musical activities. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.F.band
    TROMBONISTS Jake Myers (left) and Max Baker perform Friday at the annual Senior Citizens Luncheon at Fayette High School. The National Honor Society and the FFA chapter teamed up to serve a meal to area seniors and to provide musical entertainment. Both the school band and choir performed. Additional photos are on page 7 of this week’s Observer.
  • Front.poles
    MOVING EAST—Utility workers continue their slow progress east along U.S. 20 south of Morenci. New electrical poles are put in place before wiring is moved into place.

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